cattail

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Bass will fan out their beds tight against a growth of cattails for example, for the added protection.
Relative Frequency of Habitats--Based on results of principal-components analysis and qualitative data, I subdivided the drainage system into the following habitats: emergent cattails (thick cattails), prairie sedge meadows (thick cover of grasses, sedges, rushes), forest (thick cover by over-story canopy), cattail-forest transition (cattail-dominated channel with minimal but significant cover by over-story canopy), pioneer mudflat (high erosion potential and bank-side vegetation sparse and dominated by early succession taxa), and turf-grass (bank-side cover of Bermuda grass Cynodon dactylon).
Photos and artifacts of the park's history line the walls; there are pictures of cows grazing perhaps exactly where we're standing right now, and vegetables growing in what has since become a cattail marsh after beavers dammed the creek and flooded the fields.
On this farm forty years ago, on an autumn morning when redemption was hard in coming, a long-tailed cock pheasant unexpectedly exploded from a little patch of cattails.
On the wild side, variegate cattails are attractive, and for smaller ponds, dwarf cattail varieties offer a classic, natural appearance in a compact size.
I instinctively kicked my flippers to move the tube along the west shoreline to a patch of cattails I knew from many past trips should hold some large pumpkinseed.
Our focus was placed on the inoculation of the mercury reductase genes MerGB, which transforms methyl mercury taken up from its surroundings to ionic mercury, and MerA, which transforms ionic mercury to elemental mercury which can be released upon evaporation, into sterilized cattails (Typha latifolia, Typha glauca, and Typha dominguensis).
Cattails also crowd out the food plants, partly because of a shortage of muskrats, who control cattails by eating their roots.
From cattails I've gathered fluff, which makes excellent pillow stuffing (I'm told life vests were stuffed with it during WWII), leaves for weaving and stalks for arrows (didn't work -- too flimsy).
The change in algal mats was a subtle clue that went largely unnoticed, but the spread of the cattails alarmed managers of the Everglades.
Cattails, for example, flourish in phosphorus-rich waters, and the land downstream of agricultural areas has turned into a "monoculture of cattails," says Aumen.
Wetland plants like ferns, cattails, and swamp lilies absorb plant nutrients.
The great blue heron stands poised optimistically in the quiet water by the cattails.
Check for cattails growing in slow-moving or still water near you - a marsh, a pond, a wet ditch, or along a river bank.