catecholamine

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Words related to catecholamine

any of a group of chemicals including epinephrine and norepinephrine that are produced in the medulla of the adrenal gland

References in periodicals archive ?
In August 2019, GIAPREZA was approved by the European Commission (EC) for the treatment of refractory hypotension in adults with septic or other distributive shock who remain hypotensive despite adequate volume restitution and application of catecholamines and other available vasopressor therapies.
Although the impacts of long-term exposures to air pollution on SNS functions have been infrequently studied, plausible biological mechanisms linking long-term exposure to air pollution to systemic levels of catecholamines have been identified.
[11] It can decrease the anxiety-associated adrenergic response of the body leading to a decrease in the surge of catecholamines.
Mercury Promotes Catecholamines Which Potentiate Mercurial Autoimmunity and Vasodilation: Implications for Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate 3-Kinase C Susceptibility in Kawasaki Syndrome.
Severe hypotension, resistant to catecholamine (such as ephedrine, epinephrine, and dopamine) treatment, was developed after general anesthetic induction.
Although there was slight hyperglycemia in patients receiving 2% lignocaine without adrenaline, clinically this was insignificant and may occur as result of endogenous catecholamine release, whereas the values observed 20 minutes after administration of plain lignocaine were slightly increased from baseline values.
Continual surveillance is comprised of regular ultrasonography and urine catecholamine testing every three months with PET/CT scans only if either of these methods indicate abnormalities.
The patient was gradually weaned off catecholamines during embolization.
A 24-hour urine collection for catecholamines revealed a urine epinephrine level of 150 [micro]g (normal limit: <27 [micro]g/day).
Landsburg addresses complications and shares insights concerning catecholamines that he has gained from interacting with students who are learning about them and with clinicians whose daily activities include pharmaceuticals that impact the function of the sympathoadrenal system in many different ways.
The histological finding of contraction band necrosis (CBN) has been associated with myocardial cell injury and death, particularly related to exposure to high levels of catecholamines (endogenous or exogenous) and transient ischemia with subsequent reperfusion.
CT-angiography, advanced hemodynamic monitoring, and determination of catecholamines, chromogranin A in plasma, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in urine were performed.
The patient was asymptomatic with no history that would suggest increased catecholamines.
The 24 h urinary catecholamines and urinary vanillylmandelic acid levels were elevated.
Patient was planned for 24-hour urinary and plasma fractionated metanephrines, normetanephrines and catecholamines and I123 Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scan.