Carthage

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Words related to Carthage

an ancient city state on the north African coast near modern Tunis

References in periodicals archive ?
The film told how the magnificent north African City of Carthage was destroyed by Rome in 146BC, as the final act of the greatest conflict in the ancient world, the Punic (Carthaginian) Wars.
The film told how the magnificent north African City of Carthage was destroyed by Rome in 146 BC, as the final act of the greatest conflict in the ancient world, the Punic (Carthaginian) Wars.
Their topics include historians verses geographers: divergent uses of the ethnic name Turdetania in the Greek and Roman tradition, the city as a structural element in Turdetanian identity in the work of Strabo, Carthaginians in Turdetania: Carthaginian presence in Iberia before 237 BCE, Tyrian connections: evolving identities in the Punic west, and the economy and Romanization of Hispania Ulterior (125-25 BCE): the role of the Italians.
Tunisia had been invaded by various groups in the past, including the Carthaginians, Romans, Vandals, Byzantines, Arabs, and the Ottoman Turks.
According to him, the "Carthage and the Etruscans, an old friendship" exhibition illustrates that before Punic wars and clashes between the Carthaginians and the Romans, the Italic people had established privileged relations with the Carthaginians for about 4 to 6 centuries BC.
While it can be agreed that Polybius exaggerates the ineptitude of the Romans by stating that they, 'had not even a single boat', there is no evidence to suggest they had any sort of naval force navy which could be remotely comparable to the Carthaginians before the First Punic War (30).
Larry learns that despite Roman success in some areas, they did meet fierce opposition, not least from the Carthaginians, who revealed themselves to be every bit as cunning and resourceful as their opposition.
Andrea Salimbeti & Raffaele D'Amato, The Carthaginians 6th-2nd Century BC, Elite 201 (Oxford: Osprey, 2014).
Weird World of Wonders tracks the rise and fall of Rome - from its legendary founding by twins Romulus and Remus to its faltering last days in the fifth century AD - taking in along the way the various wars with the Carthaginians and the Gauls, its invasions and occupations, its culture and less cultural aspects, such as slavery and sacrifice.
For example, he asserts that the classical descriptions of the method of crossing the elephants over the Rhone River (ferrying them on rafts with at least some jumping off partway across) seems to assume the Carthaginians had limited knowledge of elephants, which they did not.
For example, political and military leaders of the Carthaginians were all named Hanno, Hamilcar, Hasdrubal, or Hannibal.
A Saidian orientalizing of Carthaginians is evident as is a stereotyping of non-Romans.
With the violent attacks carried out by the Carthaginians, Roman soldiers were killed, even though the fighting only lasted a few hours (Michael Grant, 1990: 99).
Nevertheless, the Roman Senate was looking for an opportunity to fight a decisive bettle against the Carthaginians to avenge the defeats of previous years.