Carolinian


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Carolinian: South Carolinian
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Carolinian

a native or resident of the Carolinas

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
The award is presented to North Carolinians with a proven record of service to the state and to others as a gesture of the state's friendship and goodwill.
"This rootsy North Carolinian may be the most buzzed-about new songwriter in folkdom," the release quotes Scott Alarik of The Boston Globe as writing.
An additional 27% learned of the service through the advertisement in the local student paper, The East Carolinian. The survey results indicate that 59% of the respondents felt greater confidence in using information sources as a result of the consultation.
Less than a month before President Bush was to be inaugurated, Clinton used a recess appointment (to a 4th Circuit seat traditionally held by a North Carolinian) to seat a Virginian named Roger Gregory--a black man who had never been a judge.
"I am the first woman and the first non-North Carolinian to serve as president of the university," says Broad.
Craig Messervy's gaze falls tar beyond the South Carolinian. low-country setting of the 841st Transportation Battalion.
In this paper, an examination will be made of the spatial correlations between rare vascular plants, SNAs and landforms in the Carolinian zone of Canada--a region which lies wholly within the Province of Ontario.
This collection of 10 cue cards presents English translations of common English words and expressions into 10 Pacific Region languages: Palauan, Samoan, Chamorro, Hawaiian, Carolinian, Chuukese, Pohnpeian, Marshallese, Yapese, and Kosraean.
The northern boreal forest is expected to whither and die, replaced after a lag of several hundred years by a north-migrating Carolinian forest.
Popularly named the "Carolinian" life zone, the region is the northern-most area of the eastern deciduous forest that extends into the deep south of the United States.
Conditions there do not promote intense dedication to fishing and/or inter-island voyaging, adaptations that shape so much of life on other Carolinian atolls.
The changing conditions within Carolinian and Cherokee society, in turn, had repercussions on the relations between the two groups.
Later he was an editor and part owner of the South Carolinian in Columbia.
The tune, originally known as "Glory Hallelujah," dates back as far as 1856 and is generally credited to William Steffe, a South Carolinian who composed many camp-meeting tunes.