carnival

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Synonyms for carnival

Synonyms for carnival

a festival marked by merrymaking and processions

a frenetic disorganized (and often comic) disturbance suggestive of a large public entertainment

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a traveling show

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References in periodicals archive ?
The introduction of farcical elements in Shakespeare's tragedies served as "a carnivalesque reminder of the eternal flow of being" (Thomas de Quincey suggested this in his great essay on the knocking at the door in Macbeth long before there was any theorizing about carnival).
In addition to billingsgate, Bakhtin also considers "comic verbal compositions, in Latin or in the vernacular" to be a convention of carnivalesque (RW, 12).
The carnivalesque hunt in "Was" is a sharp parody of the ritual hunt in "The Old People," where Isaac earns the status of a hunter in the sacred order of the wilderness.
The writers analyzed employ the civil war trope to "represent internal rebellions, conflicts, and fractures," most of them involving struggles between the disciplinary force of civility and a countering radical carnivalesque.
Along with the over-ripe spangled and over-done dresses, spirits on a wire only add a touch of the carnivalesque to what is essentially a simple graveyard in the moonlight.
Her topics include Asian sex workers and the underside of nation building, feminist subversions in comedy and the carnivalesque, shape-shifters and disciplined bodies, and desire and regeneration in Japanese North American literature.
The reason for this change of setting is unclear, but it allows the ensemble to sing a lot of Spanish dance and liturgical music, which they do beautifully, especially at the Capulets' carnivalesque party.
Chapter 9, "Epilogue: The Triumph of the Carnivalesque," recapitulates the author's insistence on Bakhtinian categories in interpreting Basile's fiction.
Delancey's Way derives its energy from its carnivalesque language.
Document of the Memory") to the not-so-Greek chorus of local witnesses that performs a carnivalesque testimonio in the midst of a whodunit mystery a la Mumbo Jumbo.
Santa Claus thus entered the Christmas season only in the nineteenth century, as an infantalized proletarian, a figure who both represented and contributed to the transformation of Christmas from a carnivalesque, public, and potentially dangerous celebration, to a private, domestic, and safe family affair.
He looks at the carnivalesque in Hard Times; crowds, mobs, and spatial separations in Shirley; and the absence of place-identity in Felix Holt.
A large portion of Castillo's novel is dedicated to a rural, carnivalesque reenactment of Lempira's death at the hands of the Spaniards.
9] Yet as this essay will go on to suggest, the status of Ligurio's advice is left purposefully obscure in a play that may not end in as carnivalesque a mode as some critics have suggested.