care

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Synonyms for care

Synonyms for care

a cause of distress or anxiety

careful forethought to avoid harm or risk

the function of watching, guarding, or overseeing

the systematic application of remedies to effect a cure

to have an objection

Synonyms

care for: to have the care and supervision of

Synonyms for care

judiciousness in avoiding harm or danger

an anxious feeling

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a cause for feeling concern

attention and management implying responsibility for safety

prefer or wish to do something

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be concerned with

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References in periodicals archive ?
A second benefit of the development process included an improved interdisciplinary approach to the care of the patient.
Walsh wrote of the plight of the needy aged: "With regard to this problem--the care of the aged poor--I may say at once that our present mode of caring for them [in 1916] is almost barbarous....
Stiefel is Director, Dental Education in Care of the Disabled (DECOD), and Associate Professor, Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, University of Washington; Past-President, Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped (1988-1990).
A suggestion: When managed Medicaid starts getting involved with funding traditional, chronic long-term care, I would advise nursing homes to stop thinking of themselves as taking care of chronic care patients "within these walls." They should remember what hospitals have gone through in recent years and start thinking of themselves as taking care of chronic care patients in whatever setting is appropriate.
LeTourneau: Would you see nurse practitioners then taking care of the basically well patient and physicians taking care of the chronically ill patient?
Kassirer succinctly summarizes this admonition: "These companies can survive, if (they) show that they care about more than profits, that they do not skimp on care, that they support their just share of teaching, research, and the care of the poor, that they no longer muzzle physicians, and that they offer something special (including controlling costs) by managing care." (3)
Services should relate to the care of people with chronic diseases and disabilities throughout their natural progression.
Finally, Zarling et al compared a large number of patients admitted to the hospital with acute diverticulitis under the care of internists, family practitioners, and gastroenterologists.
* Learn to better manage the care of the individual, again, by providing a fuller continuum of care and trying to find a step-down, such as assisted living with home care.
From a clinical standpoint, long-term care nursing is undergoing its own changes with respect to the care of these patients: more sophisticated and shorter-term care, clinical assessment requirements, crisis management and patient education initiatives, among them.
There is a separate system for care of the governing, academic, managerial, and scientific elites.
* Be sure the facility has an excellent reputation for the clinical care of long-term care residents.
To do so will require the creation of a system to manage the health care of populations while minimizing system costs and maximizing quality.
Providing clinical experiences for undergraduate and graduate nursing students and for medical students and residents is also an important contribution GNPs make to improving the care of older persons.
Major reimbursement programs, professional practice societies, and hospitals have looked to clinical pathways as a method of guiding physician and hospital treatment so that the resources expended in the care of a given patient do not exceed anticipated reimbursement.