carbon

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a thin paper coated on one side with a dark waxy substance (often containing carbon)

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a copy made with carbon paper

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References in periodicals archive ?
A high biomass yield implies good carbon fixation. It is estimated that per gram of assimilated biomass, 1.88 grams of C[O.sub.2] is fixed [7].
The parts of metabolism that guide carbon fixation through its unstable intermediate stages fall into the latter category, requiring help.
Both photosynthesis level and carbon fixation ability are affected by morphological characteristics, which are determined by both genetic and environmental factors (Parry et al., 2010).
This is what people refer to when using the terms "carbon fixation" or "sequestration." Carbon becomes "fixed" in plant tissue.
This appreciably simplifies the metabolic maps of reductive autotrophs and allows for the next generalization: that all carbon fixation pathways, oxidative and reductive, yield outputs that are routed through gluconeogenesis and glycolysis (catabolic pathways that occur only in the oxidative heterotrophs), and oxidative or reductive TCA cycles, or parts of these cycles.
Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants have yet another type of carbon fixation. CAM plants, like [C.sub.4] plants, are adapted to hot temperatures.
This system of carbon fixation is now known as the C4 pathway of metabolism.
C4 fixation is an improvement over the simpler and more ancient C3 carbon fixation strategy used by most plants.
Species rankings for carbon fixation rate, one estimate of competitiveness, depended on light levels to which their leaves were exposed.
Among their topics are redox signal transduction, carbon fixation in chloroplasts, plant mitochondrial metabolism, and photosynthetic carbon-nitrogen interactions.
Thus, a decreasing trend of net carbon fixation is expected to be triggered by decline, which eventually could lead to premature tree death (Garcia et al., 1998).
* Kenaf has a considerably fast growing speed (usually growing at a speed of three to 9 times that of the average plant), and has a preeminent carbon fixation effect (1.5t of CO2 in the air is absorbed per 1t of kenaf).
This process begins with carbon fixation and is initiated when carbon dioxide in the air diffuses into the leaves of plants and into spaces between photosynthetic cells.
Recently, Dr Tim Schmidt joined CSIRO to pursue the computational modelling of rubisco, a key photosynthetic enzyme for carbon fixation, along with Collings and Dr Peter Vohralik.
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