Capetian

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Related to Capetians: Peter Abelard, Philip Augustus
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a member of the Capetian dynasty

References in periodicals archive ?
lt;<THE ELDEST DAUGHTER OF THE KING>>: KNOWLEDGE, POWER AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CAPETIAN MONARCHY AND THE UNIVERSITY OF PARIS IN THE THIRTEENTH AND FOURTEENTH CENTURIES
By exploring the cultural, social, administrative, intellectual, and military impact of four decades of French involvement in southern Italian affairs, Dunbabin consciously seeks to question a view she identifies with historians such as Robert Bartlett: the idea that French influences were dominant in this period, with Capetian France setting a pattern that was imitated across Europe.
While the Capetians run out of direct male heirs in the 14th century, the succeeding royal homes of Valois, Bourbon, and Orleans are all descended from the Capet male line.
LoPrete not only presents a new, and more expansive, interpretation of events as they transpired in northern Europe during the decades preceding the ascendancy of the Capetians under Philip II, but she provides an invaluable source for future scholars.
Agnes's writings, for instance, can be studied within the categories of royal and Capetian sanctity, (9) and the three works can be analyzed in terms of Franciscan (Agnes and Felipa) and Carthusian (Marguerite) spirituality.
Pauline's disdain for Arthur's unfitness coexists with no small amount of pride in the aristocratic origins of the Wyants, "as if they were the last of the Capetians, exhausted by a thousand years of sovereignty" (15).
Unceasing Strife, Unending Fear: Jacques de Therines and the Freedom of the Church in the Age of the Last Capetians.
20) The title of the painting involves a monarchist conception of the origins of the French state, since it refers to the election of Hugues Capet in 987 as the first in a continuous line of French kings down to the French Revolution of 1789--in this conception of the French state, we are all Capetians now.
See William Chester Jordan, The French Monarchy and the Jews: From Philip Augustus to the Last of the Capetians (Philadelphia, 1989), 105-27.
When the Capetians came to power in the late tenth century, the king was little more than a feudal lord, holding most of his power from his position as territorial lord.
However, when reaching the eastern frontier of Rus' (as Russia is correctly but perhaps over-pedantically called until Volume Seven), Serbia, and Albania, the thirty pages dedicated to them will be considered inadequate to those with an interest in the region; others would argue that even this is a generous allocation given that the Capetians receive barely five pages more, and this in a century dominated by France.
By the thirteenth century, competition had given rise to a reterritorialization of banal powers in the hands of a dozen still competing principalities, among which the Capetians emerged eventually victorious in France.
The high insecurity of rule of the early Capetians contributed to the difficulty of contracting.
Henry is often credited with seeking to turn Westminster into an English St Denis -- a royal mausoleum and eigenkloster that proclaimed the power and dynastic success of the English royal family much as St Denis did for the Capetians.