cantata

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Synonyms for cantata

a musical composition for voices and orchestra based on a religious text

References in periodicals archive ?
He also believes that the concerto and the cantata versions (with obbligato organ) were written about the same time and form a matrix of pieces performed in the fall of 1726.
DW: 33 cantatas in 48 hours: Why did you choose this major cantata cycle for the festival's opening weekend?
The concert,supported bythe Lithuanian music and art academy assistant Yudita Leitaite and director of the Balys Dvarionas Music School Laimute Ujkuraitiene featured works by Gara Garayev, including music pieces "Little Story", "Stubborn Thoughts", "Mountains", "Forgotten Waltz", "Little Waltz", "Pavana", sonata, suit and cantata for violin and piano and other works.
10, a 55-voice cantata choir and 11-piece chamber orchestra will present Scott Stevensons "Signs of Christmas" at 9 and 10:30 a.m.
The four chamber cantatas on texts by Miloslav Bures originated in a period of intense creative activity in the years 1955-59.
A more recent scholarly intervention has allowed us to reassess twelve solo cantatas from the 18th century that have always been credited to the Venetian nobleman and composer Benedetto Marcello.
Modern vocal polyphony excels in the first cantata, In Deo speravit cor meum (1976), written to texts of Lent psalms.
Rameau though of cantatas as mini-operas, complete with characterizations and a ranee of emotions withinhigh drama.
In between the Werner selections came two arias by Bach, both beautifully sung by soprano Kristen Watson: Susser Trost, mein Jesus kommt from the Cantata BWV 151, and FloEt, mein Heiland, FloEt dein Namen from the fourth cantata of the Christmas Oratorio.
Rilling himself does the other four Discovery concerts: Cantata 19 on Monday; Cantata 130 on Wednesday; Cantatas 50 and 79 on July 1; and Cantata 149 on July 8.
Sung in Latin, the final composition carried less power than the two earlier cantatas, but with the beauty of Bach's baroque brought so professionally to life few would have minded.
For the latter work it has been suggested that the three "secular" cantatas from which Bach used music were in fact conceived with the parody process in mind.
Note that this Rossi is not Luigi Rossi, the 17th-century Roman organist and composer of two operas, numerous songs and more than 300 cantatas.
The celebratory evening also included the rejoicing music of Cantatas No 50 and 31 from the composer's earlier compositions with its wonderful explosion of festive joy from the opening voices of the chorus and its three contrasting arias to its exuberant ending.