canon

(redirected from Canon of the Mass)
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Synonyms for canon

Synonyms for canon

a principle governing affairs within or among political units

Synonyms for canon

a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy

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a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter

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a ravine formed by a river in an area with little rainfall

a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts

a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church

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a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired

References in periodicals archive ?
One inscription is taken from the preface to the canon of the Mass. Of all Sir Thomas' architectural creations, the Lodge is the most detailed and complete.
Agnes is one of seven women, excluding the Blessed Virgin Mary, who is commemorated by name in the Canon of the Mass.
The Latin Canon of the Mass was composed towards the end of the 4th-century from the Greek, and the Latin words chosen were 'pro multis' (for many), not 'pro omnibus' (for all).
The pope and patriarch shared the altar up to the creed, but not during the Canon of the Mass.
But there are fascinating |Eucharistic vignettes' from throughout western Europe presented: a pyx in the form of the Virgin, a depiction of the Virgin vested as a priest at the altar (the exact vestment is not specified), the high value placed on white flour and white bread/hosts in medieval Europe, the giving of the viaticum to women in childbirth, dances in Eucharistic processions in Spain, the giving of undiluted, unconsecrated wine to the laity to provide symmetry to the giving of the consecrated host alone, and the construction of a machine on pulleys in a church to allow angelic figures to descend at the elevation of the host during the Canon of the Mass and ascend after the paternoster.