cafe

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Synonyms for cafe

Synonyms for cafe

References in classic literature ?
At the instant that the man fell a half dozen fierce plainsmen sprang into the room from where they had apparently been waiting for their cue in the street before the cafe.
The maddened horde within the cafe were now rushing out in pursuit of their quarry.
And it was a joyful reaction which emboldened me to signal to him with a raised arm across that cafe.
It isn't my fault that they are associated with nothing better at the decisive moment than the banal splendours of a gilded cafe and the bedlamite yells of carnival in the street.
One day, a week after his visit to the Cafe de la Patrie, he called upon Valentin de Bellegarde, and by good fortune found him at home.
But that poor little wife never, to my knowledge, went to the Cafe d'Harcourt again.
There was an artist who dined at intervals at Bredin's Parisian Cafe, and, as the artistic temperament was too impatient to be suited by Jeanne's leisurely methods, it had fallen to Paul to wait upon him.
It was a weary bundle of nerves that came to the Parisian Cafe next morning.
With the prompt French instinct for the politics of the street, the man with the black moustache had already run across to a corner of the cafe, sprung on one of the tables, and seizing a branch of chestnut to steady himself, shouted as Camille Desmoulins once shouted when he scattered the oak-leaves among the populace.
He refers me to two strangers in a cafe as to two flunkeys.
While these four personages were sitting down to their game of boston, Elisabeth and her uncle Mitral reached the cafe Themis, with much discourse as they drove along about a matter which Elisabeth's keen perceptions told her was the most powerful lever that could be used to force the minister's hand in the affair of her husband's appointment.
The cafe in question was only a hundred paces away; so, when coffee had been brought, we seated ourselves, and I lit a cigarette.
Wondering inwardly what she could possibly want with his theatre, Francis reluctantly yielded to the necessities of the situation, and took her into the cafe.
I have said that "to enter the Cafe in the cul-de-sac Le Febvre was to enter the sanctum of a man of genius" - but then it was only the man of genius who could duly estimate the merits of the sanctum.
The object of their search sat in the most sheltered corner of the cafe, with his coat on and the collar turned up.