Carl Jung

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Synonyms for Carl Jung

Swiss psychologist (1875-1961)

References in periodicals archive ?
One week after I had given C.G. Jung my book as a gift, his break with me was by that time complete [perfekt]; better, half complete.
Two essays on analytical psychology, Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Vol.
One example is C.G. Jung's The Red Book: Liber Novus (2009), which was digitized to millions of pixels-per-square-inch.
Por su parte, el maestro C.G. Jung titula su obra magna "El misterio de la conjuncion" (Mysterium coniunctionis).
Phoenix Friends of C.G. Jung was formed in 1984 as a non-profit educational society, meeting to share through lectures, workshops, and related events, our common interest in the depth psychology of Swiss psychiatrist Dr.
For further detail see C.G. Jung, "The Relations Between the Ego and the Unconscious," The Portable Jung.
It should also be of great value to "writers interested in the relationship of psychoanalysis and aesthetics in both modernist studies and Romanticism, opening the door to a vision of modernism inflected by not just psychoanalysis but its Romantic precursors, as well as perhaps promising new engagements of Romantic twentieth-century psychoanalysts (C.G. Jung; Donald Winnicott) with the philosophical and cultural artifacts of the early nineteenth century.
Spanning the years 1970 through 1986, and set in locales ranging from the United States to Morocco, Belgium, and the C.G. Jung Institute within Switzerland, Keep This Quiet Too!
(1979) The Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Bollingen Series XX, translated by R.F.C.
Schooled in the writings of C.G. Jung, Joseph Campbell, and James Hillman, I find mythology to be a rich source of insight into human experience.
John Granrose, writing on "The Archetype of the Magician" (Zurich: C.G. Jung Institute, 1996) likens these two aspects, correspondingly, to ceremonial, ritual or "real" magic (in which supernatural or divine power is implied), and performance, stage, or "entertainment" magic (trickery that does not invoke supernatural powers).