Byron


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Synonyms for Byron

English romantic poet notorious for his rebellious and unconventional lifestyle (1788-1824)

References in classic literature ?
Byron struggled to live on 130 pounds a year, in Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, there lived a queer, half-mad, old grand-uncle, who had earned for himself the name of "the wicked lord." He knew well enough that when he died the little boy in Aberdeen, with the pretty face and lame foot, would become Lord Byron.
Byron had now to take his place among boys of his own class, and when he was thirteen he was sent to school at Harrow.
Byron hated Harrow until his last year and a half there; then he liked it.
It was in 1807, at the age of nineteen, that Lord Byron published his Hours of Idleness, with a rather pompous preface.
Then after a sneer at Scott for making money by his poems, Byron concludes with this passage:--
But it was not until Byron published his first long poem, called Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, that he became famous.
Then in thought Byron goes over all that took place that fateful day.
Katharine, who had risen in some confusion, could not help smiling at the thought that her mother found it perfectly natural and desirable that her daughter should be reading Byron in the dining-room late at night alone with a strange young man.
"I'm sure I should like your poetry better than I like Lord Byron's," said Mrs.
We have seen the Campanile, and Byron's house and Balbi's the geographer, and the palaces of all the ancient dukes and doges of Venice, and we have seen their effeminate descendants airing their nobility in fashionable French attire in the Grand Square of St.
Lord Byron's "dark blue seas" could not fail of being brought forward by their present view, and she gladly gave him all her attention as long as attention was possible.
These wolves are well know from Byron's account of their tameness and curiosity, whic the sailors, who ran into the water to avoid them, mistoo for fierceness.
It is true that, under existing conditions, a few men who have had private means of their own, such as Byron, Shelley, Browning, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, and others, have been able to realise their personality more or less completely.
Byron's personality, for instance, was terribly wasted in its battle with the stupidity, and hypocrisy, and Philistinism of the English.
I am a good swimmer (though without pretending to rival Byron or Edgar Poe, who were masters of the art), and in that plunge I did not lose my presence of mind.