buoyancy

(redirected from Buoyancy force)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for buoyancy

Synonyms for buoyancy

the ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement

Synonyms for buoyancy

cheerfulness that bubbles to the surface

Synonyms

the property of something weightless and insubstantial

Synonyms

the tendency to float in water or other liquid

Related Words

irrepressible liveliness and good spirit

References in periodicals archive ?
The water flow around the vehicle was simulated and the buoyancy force from the water to the moving vehicle was calculated by the fluid dynamics analysis.
2013) on a full scale laboratory setup of an operating room showed strong inward contraction of supply air jets indicating entrainment of the surrounding air into the sterile zone and they attributed this behavior to the buoyancy forces on the downward supply air jets caused by the temperature difference between the supply air and surrounding room temperature.
Therefore, the convection flow due to buoyancy force is mostly controlled on whole flow domain.
In the molten pool, buoyancy force (body force) can be expressed as in (11) by using the Boussinesq approximation, where only the effect of temperature difference is considered:
The trainers discussed that water entry simulations with life jacket were influenced by the buoyancy force of the life jacket.
This causes overall rising motion of the active fluid driven mainly by buoyancy forces, resulting in a flow with almost constant width.
According to Archimedes' principle, the buoyancy force must be equal to the weight of the volume of the fluid of the object should displace.
The temperature decreases with an increase in the heat absorption parameter because when heat is absorbed the buoyancy forces decrease the temperature profiles.
It is further assumed that the Boussinesq approximation is valid for the buoyancy force.
The four integral characteristics, such as volume flux V, momentum flux I, buoyancy force density P, and enthalpy flux Q, were obtained by integration of the approximate distributions for each small area [DELTA]S of 0.
This conclusion is a direct consequence of the observation that, in an inclined duct, the buoyancy force vector has a non-vanishing projection on the plane of the duct cross-section.
This is because the fluid velocity increases when the buoyancy force increases and hence increases the skin friction.
In all of these situations, multi component liquids can undergo natural convection driven by buoyancy force resulting from simultaneous temperature and species gradients.