pastoral

(redirected from Bucolic poetry)
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Synonyms for pastoral

Synonyms for pastoral

of or relating to the countryside

charmingly simple and carefree

Synonyms

Synonyms for pastoral

a musical composition that evokes rural life

a letter from a pastor to the congregation

Related Words

a literary work idealizing the rural life (especially the life of shepherds)

relating to shepherds or herdsmen or devoted to raising sheep or cattle

Synonyms

(used with regard to idealized country life) idyllically rustic

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
To start with, she inscribes the figure of the female peasant in the representation of the rural landscape, thus making her experience visible, but instead of presenting her as a coquettish shepherdess--as much bucolic poetry does--Boland's Achill woman exposes the privations of the rural world and the inequalities within Irish society.
New York: New Directions, 1960); Thomas Crow, "The Simple Life: Pastoralism and the Persistence of Genre in Recent Art," October 63 (Winter 1993): 41-67; David Halperin, Before Pastoral: Theocritus and the Ancient Tradition of Bucolic Poetry (New Haven: Yale Univ.
While the fictive idyllic landscapes envisioned in so many backgrounds were undoubtedly rooted in bucolic poetry, whether by such ancients as Virgil or such moderns as Sannazaro, the yearning for contact with land is palpable in this city balancing on stilts in the middle of a lagoon.
(1.) In Before Pastoral: Theocritus and the Ancient Tradition of Bucolic Poetry, David Halperin writes that "because pastoral, despite its tendency to invade the province of other well-established literary categories, had traditionally been assigned a discrete place in the literary taxonomies of the past, its status has been left in considerable uncertainty by the current flux of critical theory" (30).
Daphnis Legendary hero of the shepherds of Sicily and the reputed inventor of bucolic poetry. According to tradition, Daphnis was the son of Hermes and a Sicilian nymph and was found by shepherds in a grove of laurels (Greek: daphne).
To sum up, Leistritz's new edition not only allows a convenient access to an interesting example for the adoption and transformation of ancient bucolic poetry, but also to a first-class document for the Christian employment of ancient models in fifteenth-century Europe.