Brunhild

(redirected from Brunhilda)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Brunhilda: Austrasia
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Brunhild

a Valkyrie or a queen in the Nibelungenlied who loved the hero Siegfried

References in periodicals archive ?
El NIBELUNGENLIED puede dividirse en dos partes: la primera trata sobre la historia de Sigfrido y Krimhilda, el cortejo de Brunhilda, y como Hagen da muerte a Sigfrido y esconde el tesoro de los Nibelungos (9) en el Rin (Cantos 1-19); la segunda parte trata del matrimonio de Krimhilda con Etzel (Attila), sus planes de venganza, el trayecto de los Nibelungos a la corte de Etzel y la ultima pelea de estos en el salon del rey de los hunos (Cantos 20-39).
Anos despues Krimhilda y su esposo visitan Worms, y aunque en la realidad Gunther y su cunado son de igual rango, Brunhilda todavia esta bajo la impresion de que Sigfrido es vasallo de su marido.
I started taking voice lessons early on, but even before that, when I was 12 or 13, I went to a Halloween costume party and dressed up as Brunhilda.
Have you noticed how often that ker-azy woman with the Brunhilda plaits gets a close-up on Scrum V?
Hansel and Gretel embark on fantastic adventures after they are sent off to the Forbidden Forest by their evil stepmother, Brunhilda.
Wood believes that the queen Brunhilda provided the main Frankish support for Augustine's mission because of her own political designs.
For my own part I have made use of what seems to me the best means of blunting my sensibility to adverse criticism: I have thrown my whole mind into new work and Brunhilda and Atli, (21) though they are still by no means indifferent to me, have now become at least in so far a part of the past that I can no longer be hurt through them.
Brunhild or Brunhild or Brynhild also called Brunhilda or BrunhildeA beautiful Amazonlike princess in ancient Germanic heroic literature, known from Old Norse sources (the Eddic poems and the Volsunga saga) and from the Nibelungenlied in German.
ascendancy over her husband; Agrippina, mother of Nero, would-be usurper and skillful poisoner; Catherine de Medici of Saint Bartholomew massacre fame; Brunhilda, murderess of her husband, a Visigothic king, among others; and Fredegund, Frankish queen and multiple murderess who decapitated a rival with the lid of her trunk.
It was Brunhilda, not Fredegund, who was dragged to her death at the tail of a horse.