bromide

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Synonyms for bromide

platitude

Synonyms

Synonyms for bromide

a trite expression or idea

Synonyms for bromide

any of the salts of hydrobromic acid

a trite or obvious remark

References in periodicals archive ?
The lowest limit of bromides detection of 18 [micro]M was evaluated with pure Ag catalyst.
As pure Ag catalyst gave the lowest LOD for bromides, it was further tested for sensing of other halogen ions, namely, chlorides and iodides.
Thus, during ozonation of bromide ([Br.sup.-])-containing waters, different bromoorganic by-products are generated in the reaction of hypobromous acid (product of the reaction of [Br.sup.-] and [O.sub.3]) with natural organic matter.
Methods so far used or suggested for the detection of bromide and other halogens in water include neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ion and liquid chromatography, and fluorescence spectroscopy [2-7].
The corrosive fluids implicated in the leak at Total's Elgin field, such as calcium bromide, are commonly used in such deep-sea wells, and experts fear a recurrence as operators, under pressure to offset declining output from conventional reservoirs, turn to deeper, hotter and higher pressure fields.
"Bromide brines have been used in thousands of wells since their introduction in the 1980's," John Downs, a chemical engineer who runs his own consultancy group, told Reuters.
NEED TO KNOW Drilling engineers, equipment manufacturers and chemical experts say the long-term consequences of exposing well casings to bromide-based fluids are poorly understood, and some corrosive bromide fluids have already been banned.
In addition to the cola, other possible sources of excessive bromide exposure include pesticides, pool disinfectants, flame retardants, and hair perming solutions.
Whether spurred by that, or just by his knowledge of chemistry, he decided to add some sodium bromide to the concoction as well.
So sodium bromide would be Emerson's other ingredient.
This eventually led to the removal of sodium bromide from the product, leaving the modern version with just acetaminophen and fizz.
While there are alternatives to brominated flame-retardants, they are not "tried and true" as are bromides. Some say that the bromides must be used in order to affix the chemical to the backing of an upholstered furniture fabric.