Brobdingnag


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Related to Brobdingnag: Brobdingnagian, Houyhnhnms
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Words related to Brobdingnag

a land imagined by Jonathan Swift where everything was enormous

References in periodicals archive ?
The distinction of "the Laws of Hospitality" becomes a must in Brobdingnag, where Gulliver can survive only by rendering himself eligible for the laws.
Here the Symzonian governor, the Best Man, sounds much like the king of Brobdingnag in Swift's Gulliver's Travels, who concluded that human beings are "the most pernicious Race of little odious Vermin that Nature ever suffered to crawl on the Surface of the Earth." The considerations mentioned above, in effect, lead the ruler of Symzonia (the Best Man) to conclude that communication between the two worlds, the internal and the external, is not to be desired in the future, because that "would endanger the morals and happiness" of the Symzonian people (Symmes 2009: 85).
this bawdy mix a heady nfusion, magic and misou have the most perfectly edy for a moonlit summer rsday, August 4 (7.30pm) termouth Castle, Swansea o to www.enjoyswansea-10Gulliver's Travels Lemuel Gulliver on a fanhilarious voyage into the tiny people of Lilliput and of Brobdingnag, visit the nd of Laputa and a cound (or horsed?) entirely by es!
10 bat; The 9 Beamon; Bob 8 States; Papal The 7 ground; be to intended is which Grain 6 Argentina; 5 foot; The 4 Pacific; and Atlantic 3 Brobdingnag; 2 Botswana; 1 ANSWERS:
It is not far after this episode that Gulliver finds himself transported away from Brobdingnag, this time unintentionally, a sign of his increasing reluctance to view England as a welcoming home.
Gulliver's silly censure of the learning of the people of Brobdingnag best brings out Swift's standards by indirection: "The learning of this people is very defective; consisting only in morality, history, poetry and mathematics, wherein they must be allowed to excel.
Stasiuk introduces a Lilliputian perspective through his allusion to Jonathan Swift, evoking the scene of Gulliver's visit at the queen of Brobdingnag. In this scene a Lilliput pays homage to the monarch embracing her little finger with his both arms and kissing its tip.
Indeed I must confess, that as to the People of Lilliput, Brobdingrag, (for so the Word should have been spelt, and not erroneously Brobdingnag) and Laputa; I have never yet heard of any Yahoo so presumptuous as to dispute their Being, or the Facts I have related concerning them; because the Truth immediately strikes every Reader with Conviction.
In Kaarta, for example, Park is exposed to a roomful of curious spectators thirteen times in a row, like Gulliver when performing tricks in public houses in Brobdingnag. In Benowm the chiefs are not sure whether to put Park to death, or to relent and only amputate his right hand, a degree of mercy equal to the decision of the Lilliputians when they decide merely to blind their huge guest, and not to starve him.
Liliput y Brobdingnag son dos reinos, menudo el uno e inmenso el otro.
Jamoussi's reading of Gulliver's Travels certainly includes the political but pride of place is taken by a discussion of Gulliver's physical confinement (tied to the ground, kept in a box) in Lilliput and Brobdingnag. A link to the book's satire on Walpole's corrupt politics is suggested in that Gulliver's characteristic submissiveness to authority is seen as a conditioned reflex produced, it is hinted, by the political climate of England.
The story grows more desperate as it goes on, squeezing in a visit to the super-sized land of Brobdingnag and an inexplicable robot battle en route to a goofy cover of Edwin Starr's anti-Vietnam anthem "War." With its wacky accents and silly shenanigans, "Gulliver's Travels" could have been "Time Bandits" for a new generation, but instead feels like "Attack of the 50-Foot Couch Potato."