Brighton

(redirected from Brightons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Brighton

a city in East Sussex in southern England that is a popular resort

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
When he got back to his rooms Philip found a letter from her, saying that she thought it would be better for her to stay another week in Brighton. She had found a woman who would be glad to take the baby for seven shillings a week, but she wanted to make inquiries about her, and she was herself benefiting so much by the sea-air that she was sure a few days more would do her no end of good.
But he had nothing to do now; he might spend the week with her in Brighton, and they could be together all day.
As the train approached Brighton the sun poured through the carriage window.
Our young bride and bridegroom had chosen Brighton as the place where they would pass the first few days after their marriage; and having engaged apartments at the Ship Inn, enjoyed themselves there in great comfort and quietude, until Jos presently joined them.
Unable to make an entry into her house in Park Lane, her affectionate nephew and niece had followed her to Brighton, where they had emissaries continually planted at her door.
She found the furnished house at Brighton by stopping at an hotel in London, composing herself on a sofa, and sending for her son.
I shall get the letter, and I will go to Brighton to-morrow."
(and time only confirmed that unfavorable impression); Brighton was always the same; the sea was always the same; the drives were always the same.
Brighton, and a whole campful of soldiers, to us, who have been overset already by one poor regiment of militia, and the monthly balls of Meryton!"
She had not been many hours at home before she found that the Brighton scheme, of which Lydia had given them a hint at the inn, was under frequent discussion between her parents.
De Barral, he resumed suddenly, was not coming to Brighton for week- ends regularly, then.
How exasperated she must have been by that couple falling into Brighton as completely unforeseen as a bolt from the blue--if not so prompt.
Old Smallways would sit over the fire mumbling of the greatness of other days, of old Sir Peter, who drove his coach to Brighton and back in eight-and-twenty hours, of old Sir Peter's white top-hats, of Lady Bone, who never set foot to ground except to walk in the garden, of the great, prize-fights at Crawley.
"Orf to Brighton!" said old Smallways, regarding his youngest son from the sitting-room window over the green-grocer's shop with something between pride and reprobation.
Julia was to go with them to Brighton. Since rivalry between the sisters had ceased, they had been gradually recovering much of their former good understanding; and were at least sufficiently friends to make each of them exceedingly glad to be with the other at such a time.