bride price

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Words related to bride price

money or property given (in some societies) by the bridegroom to the family of his bride

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References in periodicals archive ?
The topic of bogadi, or brideprice (often called lobola, as elsewhere in Southern Africa), came up frequently among the Legae family, with whom I conducted my fieldwork in a rural village in south-eastern Botswana.
It was the day on which her suitor (having already paid the greater part of her brideprice) would bring palm-wine not only to her parents and immediate relatives but to the wide and extensive group of kinsmen called umunna.
Some have argued that the practice of brideprice is associated with a strong female role in agriculture, and that dowry is associated with societies in which women have a smaller role in labour-intensive agriculture.
Daughters who run to towns and cities to escape mutilation are considered to be thieves, who've stolen their brideprices from their families.
The white clerk tells him that 'If you don't have a church you better get one'(p58).The church would authenticate the marriage.Whatever rites they did in their rural home with the payment of the brideprice (lobola) through the intermediary,the munyai ,was not recognized by the white system.In Walking Still in the story,The Singer At The Wedding,Sango and his unnamed bride have a white wedding,the bide has a snow white wedding dress,an imitation wedding ring,imitation silver crown and on the eve of the wedding they have rice and chicken and on the wedding day they cut a wedding cake on a white platter.
The concept of Roora/Lobola is translated into English as bridewealth or brideprice. Because the authors are not comfortable with the translation which seems to suggest the purchase of wives, thus being value-laden, terms Lobola and Roora will be used interchangeably to refer to the phenomenon.
Moreover, evidence suggests that early marriage practices are also perpetuated by customs of dowry or brideprice, which involve significant payments directly from one family to another (Amin and Huq 2008).
In support of the patriarchy is the traditional practice of brideprice. As discussed earlier, prevailing, traditional marriage practice demands that groom's family pay the bride-price as a token of both appreciation and compensation.
1; see also Stanley Chojnacki, "Dowries and Kinsmen in Early Renaissance Venice," Journal of Interdiscplinary History 5.4 (1975): 571-60; Diane Owen Hughes, "From Brideprice to Dowry in Mediterranean Europe," Journal of Family History 3 (1978): 262-96; Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, "The Griselda Complex: Dowry and Marriage Gifts in the Quattrocento," in Women, Family, and Ritual in Renaissance Italy (Chicago, 1985); Claude Levi-Strauss, The Elementary Structures of Kinship (London, 1969); Anthony Molho, Marriage Alliance in Late Medieval Florence (Cambridge, MA, 1994).
Men tend to marry for the first time at an older age, often not until their twenties, when they are able to amass the capital necessary for brideprice, something they may do with the aid of their father or another patron.
On the contrary, Lewin points out, traditional exchange systems are especially well-suited to the concept of savings and loans--think of pigs and brideprice, she says; and it is the very sociality of these indigenous systems that make them work.
(104) SALC, supra note 78 at 54-55; in the same vein, see Adjetey, supra note 99, at 1359 ("Married women are.., trapped within restrictive marriages unless the brideprice can be returned.").
Onitsha paid her brideprice and they decided that she should have her circumcision before she moved to Lagos where it might be hard to get it done.
In predominately procreative societies, in which the primary impact of divorce is on the woman's economic security, methods of regulating nonmarital sex may be as simple as using customs like brideprice or dower to enforce marital duties or ensure the wife's economic security in case of divorce.