Schinus terebinthifolius

(redirected from Brazilian pepper)
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  • noun

Synonyms for Schinus terebinthifolius

small Brazilian evergreen resinous tree or shrub having dark green leaflets and white flowers followed by bright red fruit

References in periodicals archive ?
The fruits and leaves of Brazilian pepper tree have medicinal properties as anti-diarrheal, astringent, diuretic, purgative, stomachic, tonic, anti-inflammatory, fungicidal and bactericidal (FENNER et al., 2006).
Potential allelopathic effects of Brazilian pepper [Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Anacardiaceae) aqueous extract on germination and growth of selected Florida native plants.
Brazilian pepper trees were growing like weeds from the cracks in the concrete in LC 18 where space engineers launched Viking, Vanguard, Thor and Scout rockets vital to the development of today's cruise missiles.
This South American species produces berries in large quantities and the dried seeds are sold as Pink Peppercorns or Brazilian Pepper for spicing up dishes.
Stripes of Dymondia margaretae set into one section of concrete add a carpetlike pattern that points toward the shapely Brazilian pepper tree.
Other solutions linked to Wright's website included Temporal Tension, which was said to promote relaxation and 'clarity of the mind' and Mico Plus, said to be a 'dynamic, synergistic formula' made partially from the Brazilian Pepper Tree and 'highly potent'.
For example, Stock Island tree snails (Orthalicus reses) are limited to a few Brazilian pepper trees in Florida because development has eliminated most of their habitat.
Crews can now use it to control pests that frequent wet areas or the shores and banks of ponds and streams such as purple loosestrife, Japanese knotweed, Brazilian pepper, and Chinese tallow.
Officials from the city, state and federal governments, along with the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF), are working with residents to remove Brazilian pepper, Australian pine and other green invaders--even if it means, as on this property, razing almost every living thing in sight.
farm and grazing land, and Australian pines and Brazilian pepper trees are slurping up Florida's fresh water.
Potential allelopathic effects of Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Anacardiaceae) aqueous extract on germination and growth of selected Florida native plants.
To address problems of invasive exotic plant species, the community has worked with Friends of A1A and spent more than $100,000 to remove Brazilian pepper trees and Virginia creeper vines near the community.
Different areas of the Keys have different species of concern but Brazilian pepper, Australian pine, Asiatic colubrina, lead tree, seaside mahoe, non-native scaevola and bowstring hemp are the most abundant.
One such invader, the Brazilian pepper tree, is a shrub or tree that reaches over 30 feet in height that was introduced into Florida in the mid-1800's for use as an ornamental plant.
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