wave

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Related to Brain waves: alpha brain waves
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Synonyms for wave

Synonyms for wave

to move to and fro vigorously and usually repeatedly

to move or cause to move about while being fixed at one edge

to move (one's arms or wings, for example) up and down

to wield boldly and dramatically

to have or cause to have a curved or sinuous form or surface

Synonyms for wave

one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)

a movement like that of a sudden occurrence or increase in a specified phenomenon

something that rises rapidly

Related Words

the act of signaling by a movement of the hand

a hairdo that creates undulations in the hair

an undulating curve

a persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures)

a member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy

signal with the hands or nod

Synonyms

move or swing back and forth

move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion

Related Words

twist or roll into coils or ringlets

References in periodicals archive ?
These changes only happened during the breaks and were the only brain wave patterns that correlated with performance.
The tests further revealed that the brain appears to be actively processing magnetic information and rejecting signals that are not "natural." For example, when the vertical component of the magnetic field pointed steadily upward during the experiments, there were no corresponding changes in brain waves. Because the magnetic field normally points down in the Northern Hemisphere, it seems that the brain is ignoring signals that are obviously "wrong." This component of the study could be verified by replicating the experiment in the Southern Hemisphere, Kirschvink suggests, where the opposite pattern should hold.
Higher slow-frequency amplitude (7, 8, or 9 Hz) brain waves (while an individual's eyes are closed) are associated with greater vividness and imagery skills than lower amplitude brain waves (Wilson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson et al., 2011).
The brain waves transition to fast-frequency waves that are visually very similar to the brain waves seen during wakefulness, suggesting the brain is basically awake.
However, EEG readings showed preserved amplitude but delayed latency in difference waves, suggesting no significant disruption of brain waves through the N400.
As a controller, there are video games that are starting to emerge that use brain waves instead of joysticks.
Kim, "Interactive multimedia system using brain waves," in Proceedings of the Engineering and Arts Society in Korea Conference, 2009.
For example, Cameron Shields, 10, of Hagersville, who attended his local Brain Waves program last summer, learned new ways to interact with his grandfather Bryan who was diagnosed with a form of dementia called Pick's disease.
A mobile app under development can filter phone calls and reroute them directly to voicemail by reading brain waves, cutting the need for users to press buttons on the smartphone screen.The app, called Good Times, is the brainchild of Ruggero Scorcioni, CEO and founder of Brainyno, who presented the technology at the AT&T Innovation Showcase in New York, where some of the company's top research projects were highlighted.
In the study carried out by University of California, Berkeley, scientists found that slow brain waves generated during deep restorative sleep, which one experiences in youth, play a crucial role in transporting memories form a region in brain called hippocampus, where memories are stored for short term, to a region where these are stored for long term called the prefrontal cortex.
During this period of time, the participants' visual system will be stimulated and their brain waves was changed and then recorded at every 10-seconds interval.
The brain holds in mind what has just been seen by synchronizing brain waves in a working memory circuit, an animal study supported by the National Institutes of Health suggests.
and Wisconsin University--uses a single electrode to measure electromagnetic brain waves, or EEG.
The hope is that imagined words can be uncovered by "reading" the brain waves they produce.
She "had no interest in seeing a shrink," he said, but she agreed to neurotherapy, a treatment that helps people train their own brain waves to work differently.