Jorge Luis Borges

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Synonyms for Jorge Luis Borges

Argentinian writer remembered for his short stories (1899-1986)

References in periodicals archive ?
In Borgesian terms (or, similarly, in terms familiar from Blanchot, Mallarme, Roland Barthes, or Edmond Jabes), each book is the totality of all books, and at the same time each book can only be known in its difference from all other books.
Bello's dictionary is Borgesian in both its randomness and its inconsistencies with regards to the very idea of a definition.
Burgos makes use of this axiom to establish a parallel with the Borgesian theory that fictions are a means of representing the universe, ultimately arriving at the notion that Borges, a subcreator, "esta revelando su nostalgia de Dios, su nostalgia por Alguien que conozca lo real y no necesite morar entre ficciones" [is revealing his nostalgia for God, his nostalgia for Someone who knows the real and does not need to dwell among fictions] (174).
(Killed at the battle of Arras in 1917, Thomas covered thousands of miles during the course of his brief lifetime.) There's a sailor and storyteller who has spent most of his life studying ancient seaways and the stories that animate them; a human rights lawyer in Palestine for whom walking has become an act of resistance; and a man named Miguel Angel Blanco who has created an Borgesian archive of his many pilgrimages--hundreds of wooden boxes each containing a record of his journey and the objects and artifacts collected along the way.
It is Borgesian in tone - that is, it's mostly cool and cerebral - and in its obsessions.
In El Informe, his second novel, Kohan pits two historians writing about the period of Argentine independence against one another in a playful and ironic parody of Borgesian themes and the postmodernist deconstruction of disciplinary boundaries.
He conflates the Borgesian with the Rabelaisian; for his metaphysical adventures tend to take a more demotic form than the Mandarin master.
An archive of nearly Borgesian dimensions, it seems to catalog the many forms letters have taken in their evolution through a myriad of alphabets and languages, from the familiar hieroglyphics to the less familiar right to left flowing Arabic and Asian script from the other side of the globe.
So perfect, in fact, that the question of whether that game exists in the phenomenal world or only in an alternative, Borgesian one makes very little difference.
And there's no reason to think that still other elements cannot imitate other elements, or even all the elements imitate all the other elements--an utterly Borgesian mess.
The story ends with a very Borgesian moment when Bauer realizes that the Codex Cardona is probably lost forever ("like Hemingway's big fish torn apart by the sharks") and that all that remains of it is the book he himself has written (170).
In the same post-modernist, Borgesian, Pynchonite, late Rothian vein, Leviant concludes his narrative by offering up alternative endings: a "real" one "as authorized by the publisher and published by the author" followed by a "true" one as "approved by the novel's hero, Ayzik Klass himself in a post-hum[or]ous letter." The latter accuses the author of doctoring the really true ending.
Kopcewicz relentlessly trains us to think about literature as a Borgesian garden of endlessly forking paths, a multicursal, organic labyrinth, with endless interconnected routes, proliferating entries, twists, cross-roads as well as unexpected openings.
Even traditional mass-produced books now come to market in an increasingly open, networked environment where their fates are determined not by newspaper reviewers alone, but also by the collective judgment of readers on Amazon and social networking sites such as GoodReads, LibraryThing, and Shelfari, where visitors upload and share lists of books in their libraries, post reviews and ratings, and find like-minded readers, all in a vast Borgesian labyrinth of visible hyperlinks.