bogeyman

(redirected from Boogey man)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for bogeyman

Synonyms for bogeyman

an imaginary monster used to frighten children

References in periodicals archive ?
While this particular boogey man, The GunnyWolf, was new to me as I returned to the classroom a decade ago, I found the book included in the tomes designated by Harper Trophy, the reading series used by my new school district in Osage County, Oklahoma.
The tax exemption is the perennial boogey man of the credit union trades and the banking trades' excuse for existing when there's nothing important going on (like, say, a deep, prolonged financial crisis).
More recently, she has appeared in the British film Clubbed and played lead role Audrey in the feature film The Boogey Man 3.
Now every kid knows, even little soldiers, that the boogey man lives in the basement, hiding behind piles of coal used to stoke the clattering furnace.
Mothers told their chicks Furillo was the Boogey Man, that if they didn't behave he'd clobber 'em in their sleep."
Grabill refers to scholastic economics as "the boogey man of economic history," and provides an impressive collection of authors (Bacon, Bonaventure, Scotus, Occam) who should not be ignored as John Locke attempted to do.
Wapass applauded the City of Regina and the Regina Chamber of Commerce for helping with that education, and for not looking at urban reserves as the 'boogey man' but as a way of contributing to Regina.
He is a fluid killer; the deer's boogey man. He's been among us, at the edges of our fires, hunting alongside of us, for thousands of years.
"In television, our boogey man is the guy with a beer in one hand and the clicker in the other."
For years, I'd simply keep one or three lying within easy reach just in case the boogey man, or the monster who lives under the bed, should get out of line and require an attitude adjustment.
He made faces, taunted the cow with terrible birdlike sounds, and he flapped his arms like the boogey man toward it.
Not a triangle but a rectangle of protagonists frame this detective plot: a young assistant detective, Morava (yes, his name sounds very much like the eastern chunk of the Bohemia-Moravia Protectorate, and as a prey of Nazi predators he doubtless represents good in the novel); Morava's boss, Beran (as his name indicates, he is as stubborn as a ram and protects himself from the ugliness of politics); the Gestapo chief inspector, Buback (the boogey man who turns into a spy); and finally, Buback's superior, Meckerle, one of the most powerful Germans in occupied Prague.
I'm not referring here specifically to viruses, the Y2K boogey man, or sluggish internet connections, but the day to day challenges of navigating effectively and efficiently in this important part of the information universe.
Who can forget the bacteria boogey man of a few years back?