osteophyte

(redirected from Bone spur)
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Related to Bone spur: Heel spur, Bone Cancer
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  • noun

Words related to osteophyte

small abnormal bony outgrowth

References in periodicals archive ?
One aspect of the conflict, by the way, that I will never ever countenance is that we drafted the lowest-income level of America, and the highest-income level, found a doctor that would say that they had a bone spur.
The clinical term for a bone spur is osteophyte, and it's simply a projection that sticks out from the edge of a bone.
He had one arm over his head--very typical posture for someone suffering from a bone spur that's rubbing on the nerve root and irritating it.
It will be the third time in as many years that an operation has been deemed necessary, although this time the source of trouble is from the ligaments rather than a bone spur.
Hill said: "The surgeons found a bone spur in the actual tendon which was growing in the wrong place.
It is yet to be determined whether the bone spur which is causing discomfort around the joint will need surgery or if the course of anti-inflammatory tablets, injections and ice treatment has been sufficiently effective to avoid such measures.
Unfortunately, in Flintoff's case, the plaster was around his left foot following an op on an ankle bone spur.
She said: "Ringo had bone spur ortho shoulder surgery in January in LA.
A bone spur had to be removed from on top of his knee cap and Lee said: 'It was risky and could have easily gone wrong.
Another common injury site is the heel, where pain can indicate a plantar fascia injury or bone spur.
Lawrie, 47, has been putting off the op for a number of years - but continual pain from a bone spur and cist has forced him reluctantly into hospital.
Although Pietersen had hoped that an extended period of rest will be enough to alleviate the pain that is being produced by a bone spur in the area but surgery may be a necessary evil for the player to get rid of the problem which he sustained during the recent drawn Tests in New Zealand, the Mirror reports.
An x-ray can usually reveal the presence of a bone spur.
Simon Jones, England's king of reverse swing in 2005 until a bone spur in his ankle ruled him out of the final Test at The Oval, has revealed he resorted to a faith healer in a desperate attempt to be fit.