Boccaccio


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Synonyms for Boccaccio

Italian poet (born in France) (1313-1375)

References in periodicals archive ?
Myriam Swennen Ruthenberg, nel rileggere la sesta novella, stabilisce una rete di intertesti con il codice letterario cortese e dantesco per svelare il ruolo della dismisura e della mancanza di razionalita caratterizzanti l'umanita dell'umano secondo Boccaccio (109).
Beitrage zu Boccaccios lateinischen Werken und ihrer Wirkung.
Francis James Child's English and Scottish Popular Ballads (1882-1898) includes a traditional ballad, "Lady Diamond," that he traces hack to Boccaccio's Decameron, and to a similar tale in Cento novelle antiche, and to a variety of analogous songs and texts in other European languages.
Only one copy is known of the mid-15th-century Middle English translation of Giovanni Boccaccio's Latin prose work on famous women, and the last edition of it was published in 1924, says Cowen, without the benefit of many modern references on Middle English.
Words such as 'ragionare,' or in modern Italian, 'il bel parlare,' abound in Boccaccio's Decameron, and testify to its master's high objective: the elevation of the word to its highest artistic possibilities.
Critics have approached 2.9 from various related formal and gendered perspectives, including as a variant of wager narratives and as an example of the Decameron's discursive strategies concerning women's agency and the power of storytelling, while taking also into consideration Boccaccio's sexual poetics and intratextual self-referentiality.
Giovanni Boccaccio: intermediary between culture Classical and European Renaissance culture
The play is loosely based on Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron, a narrative originally made up of ten characters and some one hundred tales first published in the fourteenth century upon the arrival of the plague in Italy.
The appearance of a new English translation of a work like Boccaccio's Decameron, that has already been so widely and expertly translated, may well call to mind Montaigne's impatient view of commentaries: "When did we ever agree: 'this book has had enough, there is nothing more to say about it'?" Of course what Montaigne overlooks in this complaint is the ever-shifting nature of the book's readership, whose cultural circumstances, experience, and values are forever reshaping their response to, and their demands of, a given text.
Don Boccaccio, VIP's bench genius, looked hard at comm transmit power, receiver sensitivity and modulation quality, in addition to nay receiver performance.
Edmondson, George, The Neighboring Text: Chaucer, Boccaccio, Henryson, Notre Dame, IN, University of Notre Dame Press, 2011; paperback; pp.
Prominent among these was Giovanni Boccaccio, who, as Warren Ginsberg notes, "adjusted the imperatives of the past to meet needs of the present." (2) Boccaccio interpreted Amazon lore in two texts which, although written in different literary genres, were extremely popular with Renaissance readers, painters, and patrons: the Teseida della nozze d'Emilia (ca.1340-41), a vernacular epic poem with close associations to late medieval cantare, and De mulieribus claris (begun ca.1360), a contribution in Latin to the distinguished classical exemplum tradition.
Boccaccio and the book; production and reading in Italy, 1340-1520.