sphygmomanometer

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Words related to sphygmomanometer

a pressure gauge for measuring blood pressure

References in periodicals archive ?
The blood pressure cuff should be placed on bare skin, not over a shirt.
Exercise is not necessarily prohibited, and we advise patients to engage in their usual daytime activities--except activities that may result in dislodging the blood pressure cuff.
The easy-to-use BioArmour BPCS is a disposable antimicrobial hygienic barrier that attaches to the blood pressure cuff to prevent direct contact of the cuff with the patient's skin.
US-based SunTech Medical, a leader in non-invasive blood pressure measurement products and technologies, has rolled out its new line of disposable blood pressure cuffs.
Motivated by favorable studies, the hypertension clinic started using the monitors about a year ago, switching from office readings and automated blood pressure cuffs that caretakers used to take a few measurements a day at home.
The nursing student chose not to use the available, regular adult-size blood pressure cuff because it was too small to fit the patient's upper arm appropriately.
Keep a large/extra-large blood pressure cuff in the resident's drawer to ensure an accurate and consistent reading.
The ankle brachial index test, used to diagnose PAD, employs a device similar to a blood pressure cuff to compare blood flow in the ankle to blood flow in the arm to detect poor circulation caused by PAD.
Researchers then measured each rower's pain threshold by putting an inflated blood pressure cuff on the arm and getting the rower to say "now" when he felt discomfort.
I use an extra-large blood pressure cuff to take their readings but it often extends past the brachiocubital area of the arm and it's sometimes difficult to get the head of the stethoscope under the cuff and in a good position.
Cushing advocated the routine use of the blood pressure cuff in the operating theatre: "As stated elsewhere, I feel assured that by placing reliance on the blood-pressure charts kept during critical operations in the past year, it has been possible to anticipate and ward off severe conditions of surgical shock, and indeed in some instances to save lives" (1).
The initial set of vital signs was taken with an automated blood pressure cuff.
It should be easy--put on the blood pressure cuff, pump it up, slowly let out the air and listen for the beat with a stethoscope.
In response to the letter from David Sherman in which he describes the difficulty of measuring blood pressure in patients whose upper arms are too large for conventional blood pressure cuffs ("Manufacturers Can Solve Our Blood Pressure Cuff Problem," November 2006: 540), I would like to comment.
The measurement to determine central venous pressure (CVP) -- a reading that gives doctors important information about the volume of blood circulation and how well the heart is pumping -- now can be done using a simple blood pressure cuff and special electrodes connected to a computer.