Edmund Spenser

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Synonyms for Edmund Spenser

English poet who wrote an allegorical romance celebrating Elizabeth I in the Spenserian stanza (1552-1599)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Calidore's task is carried out in vain: he chains up the Blatant Beast, but it soon breaks loose.
Eventually, it will make possible the long awaited closure of Bellamour and Claribell's circle whose description, in an effort to illustrate the "filed" wrongdoings of the past meeting a "repaired" present, appears hand in hand in the same canto where Calidore retakes his quest and captures the Blatant Beast. Claribell and Bellamour represent the last of a list of situations that started in the realm of privacy and, more importantly, of secrecy.
At the end, only the right reunions take place: Pastorella and her parents, Calidore and the Blatant Beast. The propriety of these encounters lies in the fact that they are susceptible to being publicized without provoking any social disrupture.
Continuing his quest, Artegall met two hags, Envy and Detraction, who defamed his character and set the Blatant Beast barking at his heels.
The Blatant Beast, defamer of knightly character and the last remaining enemy of the fairy court, finally met his match.
Book VI: The Legend of Calidore, or of Courtesy Sir Calidore (Courtesy), in pursuit of the Blatant Beast (Slander), finds the fair Pastorella, the foster - daughter of a shepherd, and falls in love with her.
Ben Jonson's contribution to Spenser's criticism has usually been centred around three often reproduced comments: that Spenser died for lack of bread in Westminster, that the Blatant Beast was a satire on the puritans and that he writ no language in his poetry.
Continuing his quest, Artegall met two hags, Envy and Detration, who defamed his character and set the Blatant Beast barking at his heels.
Uncannily like his adversary, the Blatant Beast, he continually violates private worlds.
(21) Finally, I situate Calidore's victory over the brigands and partial victory over the Blatant Beast in relation to Spenser's treatment of those modes and concerns about his own authorial legacy.