Bewick's swan

(redirected from Bewick's swans)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Bewick's swans: tundra swan
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Bewick's swan

Eurasian subspecies of tundra swan

References in periodicals archive ?
Strapped to a propeller, brave Sacha will take to the skies with a paraglider in a bid to find out why the numbers of Bewick's swans are declining so dramatically.
Her expedition, the Flight of the Swans, is the first ever attempt to follow the migration of the Bewick's swan from the air.
However, experts at Gloucestershire wildfowl sanctuary were stunned to discover that a pair of Bewick's swans returned to winter at the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust centre at Slimbridge - with new partners.
Roughly 2,500 birds live here permanently, but 30,000 can visit per year, including Bewick's Swans from Arctic Russia.
Some 9,000 Bewick's swans and 10,000 whooper swans come to British waters to escape the harsh winter of their northern homes.
And further west, near Berkeley Castle, is Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust, home to thousands of birds, including flamingos and Bewick's Swans which journey 2,600 miles from Russia every year.
Winter really wouldn't be winter without the hundreds of majestic Bewick's Swans that fly in from arctic Russia to spend the festive season in the relative warmth of Gloucestershire.
About 500 migratory Bewick's swans at a park in Yonago, Tottori Prefecture, were apparently terrified by millennium fireworks on New Year's Day and flew off, park officials said Monday.
FLOCKS of Whooper and Bewick's Swans have been arriving to spend the winter roosting on deep, open water alongside our resident Mute Swans.
Toshitaka Koseki, head of Yonago park, said, "Even the small number of Bewick's swans remaining in the park on Saturday evening left.
1991) found that Bewick's swans (Cygnus columbianus bewickii) only grazed in areas where tubers were most abundant.
Sportswoman and conservationist Sacha Dench is set to undertake the migration of Bewick's swans from the Russian Arctic to the UK by flying on a lone expedition with the birds, using just a parachute wing and a small propeller engine, at altidtues as low as 100 metres (328 feet).
Nearby, three Bewick's Swans are at RSPB Oakenholt Marsh and a Great White Egret at Sealand Ranges.