mala fide

(redirected from Bad faith)
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  • adj

Synonyms for mala fide

not being what one purports to be

References in periodicals archive ?
Third Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Stecherts may pursue their bad faith breach of contract claim against Travelers, reversing a district court decision to grant summary judgment in favor of the carrier.
But Robes denied that her change of party was done in bad faith. She said she would talk to both parties to clarify the matter.
We've had three years of Bad Faith Brexit behaviour that's bamboozled the media into not pulling apart the obvious flaws in their unicorn plans.
Listen as a panel of distinguished professionals organized by The Knowledge Group provide the audience with the latest information regarding bad faith insurance litigation.
We further conclude that given the allegations that Koss Corporation asserts in regard to its claim that Park Bank is liable for the intentional tort of bad faith, no proof has been proffered of bank dishonesty wherein Park Bank willfully failed to further investigate compelling and obvious known facts suggesting fiduciary misconduct because of a deliberate desire to evade knowledge of fiduciary misconduct.
Defendant opposes remand and asserts that Plaintiff prevented a timelier removal in bad faith.
Particularly, they said that the findings did not show how they acted with manifest partiality, evident bad faith or gross inexcusable negligence.
1 The new "bad faith" exception was intended to discourage forum manipulation by plaintiffs while maintaining a temporal limitation on removals.
'It is reckless and in bad faith to dispute the role of the Senate.
When the claim is in dispute, the policyholder may believe that the company is acting in bad faith and file a lawsuit.
The United Arab Emirates Federal Supreme Court recently upheld important principles in relation to well-known trademark protection and elements; bad faith as a reason to lose ownership of a prior-filed application; and the need to consider ownership in the country of origin.
Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in In re Forever Green Athletic Fields, Inc., upheld the dismissal of an involuntary bankruptcy proceeding that was filed in bad faith. It did not matter that the petitioning creditors had satisfied all of the requirements contained in Bankruptcy Code Section 303 for obtaining relief on an involuntary petition.
The Claim: Windsor is accusing Asics of bad faith and fraud.