Augustinian Canons


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Related to Augustinian Canons: Augustinian order, Augustinian Canons Regular
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an Augustinian monastic order

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Part VI, 'Literary Self-Consciousness and Literary History', signals a textual turn, especially towards texts associated with religious orders: Helen Barr historicises the (probably Benedictine) Digby Lyrics through its syntax and 'homely' diction; Susanna Fein excavates the Augustinian canon John Audelay's neglected Counsel of Conscience and its fantastically indulgenced prayers, 'spiritual exercises' composed for a noble family; W.
The Priory is in the Black Mountains and was one of the earliest houses of Augustinian Canons to be found in the British Isles.
The Victorines were a group of Augustinian canons from the Abbey of St.
Ralph Hanna draws attention to neglected Augustinian canons and their influence.
The cathedral was founded in the 12th century by Augustinian canons but after the Reformation it was abandoned and fell into ruin.
Take, for example, Mark Dilworth's attention to continuity in his study of Augustinian canons regular during the Reformation: here is evidence of 'vitality and desire for reform' (p.
Fassler argues that this new repertory was closely associated with a reform agenda promoted by Augustinian canons at the Abbey of St.
Here the Victorine context is established in considerable dtail, notably in chapters 9 and 10, where a detailed section on the Augustinian canons and the 'politics of reform' prepares the reader for a study of one of the great Victorine teachers, Hugh of St Victor.
Consequently she argues that the parish clergy from the unusually well educated rectors and vicars, the myriad chantry priests and the unbeneficed stipendiary priests formed a homogeneous body of secular clergy which lived harmoniously with the Augustinian canons of St Augustine's abbey, the Benedictines of St James's priory and the friars of the four town convents.
Over the past fifteen years, Pavel Krafl has published extensively in Czech and Polish on the Augustinian canons regular and on their confraternities.
Mareike Menne describes the devotional practices of the Augustinian canons at Dalheim, including the impact of the Modern Devotion in the late fifteenth century, the character of cloister life, and the abbey's role in parish activities.
The book seems to have belonged throughout most of its medieval history to a sequence of Augustinian canons from Guisborough priory (Cleveland, North Yorkshire).