References in periodicals archive ?
and the Boys: Athol Fugard and the Psychopathology of Apartheid " Modern Drama 30.
But we should bear in mind that he has worked for decades in the company of South Africa's greatest actors--Pieter-Dirk Uys, Paul Slabolepszy, Bill Flynn, Wilson Dunster, his wife Yvonne Bryceland, and writers such as Athol Fugard and Geraldine Aron.
More importantly, for this bleak but still important play by an important dramatist, neither does Athol Fugard.
Konga is joined by Habib Dembele who takes on numerous roles, including those of Styles and Buntu, with equal vigour - providing both emotion and humour in this second of three statement plays created by Athol Fugard.
First staged in Cape Town in 1972, the play was jointly devised by Athol Fugard and the original actors, John Kani and Winston Ntshona, who performed it again as recently as last year.
Written by Athol Fugard, Winston Ntshona and John Kani, who is currently starring in Nothing but the Truth at Birmingham's Repertory Theatre, the play came out of apartheid South Africa.
Thirty-five years ago I saw John Kani and Winston Ntshona perform Sizwe Banzi Is Dead by Athol Fugard in London.
Writer-director Gavin Hood delivers a compelling morality tale, adapted from a novel by Athol Fugard, that steadfastly avoids pat sentimentality or sermonising.
One can also concur with the commentators' remark that this play is part of the tradition started by Athol Fugard and others, of the so-called "protest theatre" or "political theatre" in this country.
The foreign language Oscar winner, Tsotsi, from South Africa, is based on an early novel by Athol Fugard, known in the United States primarily as a playwright.
and the boys, written by Athol Fugard, chronicles an embarrassing and painstaking chapter from the playwright's own teenage years.
Casting Shadows: Images from a New South Africa by Lesley King-Hammond, Mongane Wally Serota, Lemuel Johnson and Athol Fugard Photographs by Edward West University of Michigan Museum of Art January 2001, $40.
Fine art and literature met at the world premiere of "Sorrows and Rejoicings," a play by South African writer Athol Fugard at the McCarter Theatre Center.
Kriben Pillay's "Narrative Devices, Time and Ontology in Sizwe Bansi Is Dead" and "The Amistad Affair and the Nation of Sierra Leone" by Iyunolu Osagie are insightful, the former for its emphasis on the staging and performance of this one-act play by Athol Fugard, John Kani, and Winston Ntshona, and the latter for Osagie's discussion of the impact that the play Amistad Kata1