Assyriology

(redirected from Assyriologist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Assyriology

archeology of the ancient Assyrians

References in periodicals archive ?
No less telling are the anti-minimalist arguments itemized by a leading Israeli Assyriologist and Bible scholar, Professor Gershon Galil of Haifa University, in "Milhemet Hafirot" ("The Excavations War"), a feature article by Assaf Wohl published in the weekly supplement of Makor Rishon, August 12, 2011, pp.
It was brought fully to life in three lectures by the German Assyriologist Friedrich Delitzsch that were published in both Germany and the United States.
Apart from the notorious "Bible-Babel" debate among scholars affirming or denying Gilgamesh's kinships to biblical tales, of which the flood story is but one, interpretations of the epic by Assyriologists and biblical scholars have widely varied.
Frymer-Kensky is an Assyriologist and a Sumerologist who has focused her interest in questions of gender in antiquity as much on the Hebrew Bible as on the literature of the great Mesopotamian civilizations.
Sir Wallis Budge, the noted Egyptologist and Assyriologist, said that the Egyptians mummified the heart separately from other organs of the body in their rituals, but others more recently have dissented.
The earliest scripts from such civilizations as ancient Sumeria, Egypt, and China "were invented as systems - not through gradual evolution, but in quantum leaps in the history of communication," contends assyriologist Piotr Michalowski of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, who studies ancient Near Eastern cultures and languages.
College Dublin, Ireland) collects the letters (mostly previously unpublished) of Edward Hincks (1792-1866), an Irish Assyriologist and decipherer of Mesopotamian cuneiform.
In 1935 the British Assyriologist Stephen Langdon wrote, "The Sumerians named this constellation 'The Hireling,' or Labourer for some unknown reason.
What the Assyriologist does not say is that Ishtar and Inanna were variant names of the same goddess, perhaps because she professionally thinks in terms of the Assyrian name, not the Babylonian one.
Professor Bottero is a leading Assyriologist with a record of over forty years of distinguished scholarship.
Snell, an Assyriologist and biblical scholar at the University of Oklahoma, is eminently qualified to undertake the difficult task of compressing 8000 years of the history of the Near East and Egypt (from the beginning of agriculture to Alexander the Great) into less than 150 pages, in a way that is accessible to a general reader or undergraduate.
Ever since the days of the famed Assyriologist, Eberhard Schrader (1836-1908), scholars have identified this king with none other than Hammurabi.
The Finnish Assyriologist Simo Parpola translated and analyzed these texts in several publications, including Letters from Assyrian Scholars to the Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (1983).
The rest of the book is structured around a series of interviews and portraits of some of the most prominent women biblical scholars in the United States: Phyllis Trible of Union Theological Seminary, Carol Meyers of Duke University and the Sepphoris excavation project, Tikva Frymer-Kensky, Assyriologist and Sumeriologist at the University of Chicago, literary critic Mieke Bal ofthe University of Amsterdam, Elisabeth Schussler-Fiorenza of Harvard Divinity School, Kathleen Corley of the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Karen Jo Torjesen of Claremont University, Karen King of Occidental College and now Harva rd Divinity School, Bernadette Brooten of Brandeis University, Ross Kraemer of the University of Pennsylvania, and one man, Jaroslav Pelikan of Yale University.