Assumption of Mary


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Synonyms for Assumption of Mary

celebration in the Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life ended

References in periodicals archive ?
The seven will be recognized at the vespers service for the Feast of the Assumption of Mary on Aug.
The Catholic holy days of Good Friday, Easter, Corpus Christi, Assumption of Mary, All Saints' Day, Immaculate Conception Day, and Christmas are national holidays.
August 15 itself is the feast of the Assumption of Mary.
The Assumption of Mary is treated in the next to last chapter, locus classicus for the idea of spiritual ascent to bodily delight in heavenly experience.
The first studies the early literature, starting in the second half of the fifth century, written in Syriac, Greek, Coptic, Arabic, Ethiopian, Latin, Georgian, Armenian, relating to the Dormition and Assumption of Mary.
Assumption of Mary (Eastern Orthodox Church)--holiday in Macedonia, Serbia, Montenegro
Every doctrine or practice familiar to Catholics has a history of its own, and some official expressions of church teaching are quite recent, such as the dogmas of the Immaculate Conception (1854) and Assumption of Mary (1950).
The Assumption of Mary is the traditional belief held by Christians that the Virgin Mary at the end of her life was physically taken up into heaven.
The Roman Catholic holy days of Good Friday, Easter, Corpus Christi, Assumption of Mary, All Saints' Day, Immaculate Conception Day, and Christmas are national holidays.
Plus XII followed suit, declaring the Assumption of Mary an article of faith and asserting that "the baby, still to be born, is human in the same degree and for the same reason as the mother.
Jung considered the 1950 dogma of the Assumption of Mary into Heaven as the "most important spiritual development since the Reformation.
The work sharply critiques hierarchical use of the doctrine of natural law (239-51) as well as three selected "modern papal doctrines," Infallibility, the Immaculate Conception, and the Assumption of Mary (251-61).