artefact

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Related to Artefacts: Artifacts
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References in periodicals archive ?
The US was cooperating with Iraq on returning stolen artefacts, and that over 1,500 had been brought back to Iraq from the United States so far, he said.
Mayahi stated that around 15,000 artefacts were stolen from the national museum in Baghdad by looters in the chaos that followed the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq.
Artefacts and sites will occur at medium to high density on the flats and immediate river banks (fourth-order streams and above) if they are above the flood level.
Artefacts and sites will occur at a high density on the low slopes (base of ridgesides), low spurs and creek banks that run down to rivers.
A huge Palestinian police force moved to the scene and arrested the suspect and seized the artefacts before they left the Palestinian territories.
The police statement said that the seized artefacts included ancient coins, rare pottery pieces which dated back to early eras such as the Cannites.
The suspect who, by that time had sold the artefact, was arrested.
A problem with this distinction between technical artefacts and systems is that the meaning of the notions of scale and complexity is highly context-dependent.
We think, however, that there are two reasons why the Russian doll metaphor for the relation between technical systems and technical artefacts is misleading.
There is ongoing dispute about other space-time patterns of backed artefacts in Australia.
Although we now know that backed artefacts were made in the early and late Holocene, Australian archaeologists failed for so long to recognise this because (a) they interpreted the absence of such artefacts as an indication that they were not made or used, and (b) they sometimes discounted small numbers of these distinctive artefacts as an error of some kind, such as might be produced by stratigraphic disturbance (see Hiscock and Attenbrow 1998 for details).
And obscurity, though a defect in other kinds of artefacts, is not so in art.
The implication is, of course, that we are not free to interpret artefacts, such as artworks, as we wish.
Decades later Capertee 3 remains an important site in discussions of Holocene assemblage change in Australia because multiple investigators have argued that backed artefacts at the site are restricted to the late Holocene.
It has now been established that backed artefacts were made, at least at low rates and in some locations, in the early Holocene (Hiscock and Attenbrow 1998).