transferrin

(redirected from Apotransferrin)
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Related to Apotransferrin: ferritin, hemosiderin, apoferritin
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  • noun

Synonyms for transferrin

a globulin in blood plasma that carries iron

References in periodicals archive ?
Ferroxidase has also been implicated in iron homeostasis because it catalyzes the oxidation of free iron to promote iron incorporation into apotransferrin or the Fe storage protein ferritin [18, 44].
The apotransferrin-receptor complex is then recycled to the cell surface with a return to neutral pH and the concomitant loss of affinity of apotransferrin for its receptor.
Reduction of circulating redox-active iron by apotransferrin protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.
Although chromium is considered synergistic to iron [4] and some researchers have found lower concentrations in blood of anaemic patients when compared to control subjects [17], it is known as an antagonistic competition between trivalent chromium and trivalent iron for binding to apotransferrin [4,19].
The cortices were mechanically disrupted into single cells by repeated pipetting in a serum-free conditioned medium ([N.sub.2] medium) containing DMEM/F12 (1: 1), 0.6% (w/v) glucose, 0.1125% (w/v) sodium bicarbonate, 2 mM L-glutamine, 5mM HEPES, 100 [micro]g/mL human apotransferrin, 20 nM progesterone, 30 nM sodium selenite, 60 putrescine, and 25 [micro]g/mL insulin.
Antioxidants such as dipyridamole, apotransferrin, vitamin E, and N-acetylcysteine are known to have some neuroprotective potentials against oxidative stress including reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which are increased during hypoxia and postischemic reperfusion stages.
From there, iron is absorbed into the blood by apotransferrin, which becomes transferrin as it binds two ferrous ions.
The ferric iron then binds to apotransferrin (the iron-free form of transferrin) in the plasma to form Fe(III)-transferrin (TF) complex, which is the major type of iron present in blood.