aposematic coloration

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Related to Aposematism: Voltinism, Mullerian mimicry
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Synonyms for aposematic coloration

conspicuous coloration or markings of an animal serving to warn off predators

References in periodicals archive ?
about low-quality food yet again implies aposematism.
Many functions have been proposed for this secretion, such as camouflage, alarm signal, pheromone, aposematism (use of color patterns by prey animals to signal their distastefulness to predators), bile excretion, predator deterrent, and cue of danger (Johnson & Willows 1999).
EVIDENCE OF APOSEMATISM IN AN ALREADY UNPALATABLE AND GREGARIOUS MILKWEED BUG, ONCOPELTUS FASCIATUS, IN RESPONSE TO VERTEBRATE AND INVERTEBRATE PREDATION AND A MEASURE OF THE COSTS, BENEFITS AND TRADE-OFFS OF A COMPROMISED GROWTH RATE
In the initial origin experiment, prey items (pieces of rye straw filled with animal fat) signaled their aposematism (spiced with chloroquinine) by having the opposite symbol than the background or signaled palatability by having the same signal as on the background.
The experiments show that aposematism probably evolved first in groups of unpalatable prey, but that other species that later adopt similar markings may not benefit from group living, the authors conclude.
Aposematism is a defensive adaptation in which a conspicuous coloration is used to warn potential predators that a species is chemically or otherwise defended (Cott, 1940; Cortesi and Cheney, 2010).
3A) and their shiny and contrasting black coloration suggests they are unpalatable or poisonous to predators, being thus a case of aposematism or warning coloration, produced through natural selection as originally proposed by Alfred Russel Wallace (Wallace 1879; Poulton 1890; Joron 2003).
A high incidence of aposematism was observed in the plants of the region.
Thus, some explanation is required for at least the initial diversification, and indeed for the origin of aposematism itself.
2008), aposematism (Brower 1958), industrial melanism (Kettlewell 1961), and mimicry (Jiggins et al.
This defensive mechanism in which groups of similarly colored species share the cost of the education of predators is called Mullerian mimicry (Muller, 1879) and it implies aposematism, whereas Batesian mimicry occurs in otherwise undefended species that rely on resembling the unpalatable ones (Bates, 1862).
Predation pressure therefore, is one of the most important selective forces resulting in the evolution of escape behavior, crypsis, aposematism, armor, chemical defense (Lima & Dill 1989) and possibly the most extreme defense: sacrificing a limb or other appendage to the predator (Arnold 1988).
Aposematism and Batesian mimicry: measuring mimetic advantage in natural habitats.