antinomian

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Related to Antinomians: Anne Hutchinson, Quakers, Judaizers
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a follower of the doctrine of antinomianism

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Prior to the outbreak of New England's free-grace controversy, ministers had been engaging with antinomians in an effort to prevent the splintering of a community of faith.
Furthermore, shamanistic elements appear to be more common in Sufism than Buddhist elements, particularly among antinomian Sufis.
At one point we learn there were seven antinomian preachers in London, at another, five.
The core of Blown by the Spirit, following a chronological and scene-setting overview, is a series of focused chapters on the likes of John Traske (not the judaising Saturday-sabbatarian of the early Jacobean period, who had strong and literal respect for the Mosaic law, but Traske's later, antinomian self).
Antinomians then took refuge in various locations in the countryside, sustaining a sense of shared purpose and belief through such activities as the circulation of manuscripts, and providing, in Como's view, the "womb" responsible for generating the radical opinions that appeared in the civil war years that followed.
Seventeenth-century antinomians, Abiezer Coppe, Laurence Clarkson, and Jacob Bauthumley are given a free ride on behalf of "an escape from selfishness into universal love" (95), but early nineteenth-century liberals are generally found wanting, and treated to a disdain that accords with their hegemonic tendencies.
5) Wright argued that debates about the issue of grace did not define the theological outlook of Lambe's Bell Alley Church at this early date, but rather those disputes took place within that congregation that seems to have combined both free-willers and high-Calvinist antinomians.
Forsyth, Positive Preaching and the Modern Mind) "Today, the role seems to be reversed: private antinomians and public moralizing.
Winthrop's A Short Story of the Rise, reign, and ruine of the Antinomians, Familists, and Libertines recounts, for example, Hutchinson's response to a visit made to her after her banishment by "foure .
David Hume on Puritan-era factions: "The Antinomians even insisted that the obligations of morality and natural law were suspended, and that the elect, guided by an internal principle more perfect and divine, were superior to the beggarly elements of justice and humanity.
Though his detailed exegesis is carefully limited, Tallack ranges widely in the course of his argument, drawing starting-points and examples from unexpected sources: John Winthrop's 'A Short Story of the Rise, Reign, and Ruine of the Antinomians, Familists, and Libertines that Infected the Churches of Massachusetts Bay', for example, or Poe's two reviews of John Lloyd Stephens's Arabia Petraea, or Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia, and the Holy Land.
Then there were those who broke the law on grounds of religious principle, dissenters like the antinomians, the Quakers and, of course, the Diggers, who defied landlords and law with a spirited defense of traditional liberties.
Joachist ideas also passed into the Reformation, especially among the more extreme sects such as the Anabaptists and the Antinomians.
The preface to the second edition of John Winthrop's account, A Short Story of the Rise, Reign, and Ruine of the Antinomians reads:
He also wrote A Short Story of the Antinomians (1644).