stibnite

(redirected from Antimony sulfide)
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Related to Antimony sulfide: antimony oxide, Antimony trisulfide, Arsenic sulfide
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Words related to stibnite

a soft grey mineral

References in periodicals archive ?
[8] Jun-Jie Liu, Ming-Way Lee, "Lead Antimony Sulfide Semiconductor-Sensitized Solar Cells", Electrochimica Acta, 119, 59- 63, (2014).
On the other hand, sample 3 shows a low-intensity peak at ~306 [cm.sup.-1], which indicates the presence of antimony sulfide. This investigation also suggests that there is less possibility of [beta]-[Cu.sub.3]Sb[S.sub.3] as there is an absence of a strong peak at ~321 [cm.sup.-1] [16].
A number of processes were used to synthesize antimony sulfide with different morphologies: single-crystal [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] nanotubes via EDTA-assisted hydrothermal route [1], nanocrystalline [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] by microwave-assisted synthesis [2], [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] peanut-shaped superstructures [3], rod-like [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] dendrites [4] and [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] nanorods [5] by hydrothermal reaction, double sheaf-like [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] by copolymer-assisted hydrothermal synthesis [6], [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] nanowires [7] and [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] nanoribbons [8] by solvothermal route, [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] nanowires by PEG-assisted solvothermal process [9], and orthorhombic [Sb.sub.2][S.sub.3] twin flowers in the solutions containing CTAB by a cyclic microwave radiation [10].
One alternative to lead sulfide is another toxic compound, antimony sulfide. Imported cosmetics are one of the relatively few sources of significant lead exposure for infants too young to crawl or walk; however, exposure to lead in tiro represents an additional burden to groups who might be exposed to other sources of lead.
Stibnite, described in 1832, is antimony sulfide, S[b.sub.2][S.sub.3].
When the primer explodes, lead and other elements such as barium nitrate, mercury and antimony sulfide are released as toxic gases.
In British Columbia the Silver Tunnel of the Van Silver mine has produced hundreds of rare and beautiful crystal specimens of lead and silver antimony sulfides, including fizelyite crystals which are among the best in the world.