animal

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Synonyms for animal

Synonyms for animal

relating to the desires and appetites of the body

Synonyms for animal

References in classic literature ?
The process of learning, which consists in the acquisition of habits, has been much studied in various animals.
The animals in cages, which gradually learn to get out, perform random movements at first, which are purely instinctive.
We may then distinguish "vital" from mechanical movements by the fact that vital movements depend for their causation upon the special properties of the nervous system, while mechanical movements depend only upon the properties which animal bodies share with matter in general.
Till at last he had no one left--except the Cat's-meat-Man, who didn't mind any kind of animals.
An immense track, of dazzling whiteness, marked the passage of the animal, and described a long curve.
The latter, after having observed the animal attentively, called the engineer.
The Abraham Lincoln, propelled by her wonderful screw, went straight at the animal.
He was quick in his classification, for he knew them at once for man- animal noises.
That large animals require a luxuriant vegetation, has been a general assumption which has passed from one work to another; but I do not hesitate to say that it is completely false, and that it has vitiated the reasoning of geologists on some points of great interest in the ancient history of the world.
Now, if we look to the animals inhabiting these wide plains, we shall find their numbers extraordinarily great, and their bulk immense.
I confess it is truly surprising how such a number of animals can find support in a country producing so little food.
O mine animals, answered Zarathustra, talk on thus and let me listen
O Zarathustra," said then his animals, "to those who think like us, things all dance themselves: they come and hold out the hand and laugh and flee--and return.
is most difficult: my impression is, that with animals such agencies have produced very little direct effect, though apparently more in the case of plants.
In animals it has a more marked effect; for instance, I find in the domestic duck that the bones of the wing weigh less and the bones of the leg more, in proportion to the whole skeleton, than do the same bones in the wild-duck; and I presume that this change may be safely attributed to the domestic duck flying much less, and walking more, than its wild parent.