Anglo-Saxon

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Synonyms for Anglo-Saxon

a native or inhabitant of England prior to the Norman Conquest

a person of Anglo-Saxon (especially British) descent whose native tongue is English and whose culture is strongly influenced by English culture as in WASP for 'White Anglo-Saxon Protestant'

English prior to about 1100

References in periodicals archive ?
Anglo-Saxons loved riddles, both verbal and visual, which run through their poetry and art.
Invading Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Normans may have shaped the history, culture and language of the British Isles, but they left surprisingly few genetic traces behind.
THE Anglo-Saxons were Germanic warrior-farmers who invaded at the end of the Roman era.
On Saturday,11am to 3pm, explore the daily lives of the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings by handling some of the things they would have seen every day and on Sunday, step into the shoes of Eadfrith, the monk who hand-wrote the Lindisfarne Gospels by trying out using an Anglo-Saxon quill.
On Saturday, 11am to 3pm, explore the daily lives of the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings by handling some of the things they would have seen every day and on Sunday, step into the shoes of Eadfrith, the monk who hand-wrote the Lindisfarne Gospels by trying out using an Anglo-Saxon quill.
PEOPLE can learn about how the Anglo-Saxons and Victorians lived during two evening workshops in Warwick.
These 700 years saw continuous ebb and flow due to the invasions by Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings and Normans, each adding to or taking away from the written word and each adding a new language and in some cases a new religion.
Even Churchill himself did not speak of Anglo-Saxons much.
And where the Welsh opt for the more simpler "leave", as the early Anglo-Saxons would have, the English, preferring the language of the Roman invaders, are more likely to say "departure".
Radio carbon dating demonstrates a likely date of around 780AD, meaning these remains are Christian Anglo-Saxons.
Then he describes how official Roman Christianity arrived among the Anglo-Saxons through Augustine and Paulinus, Aidan and Cuthbert, and Theodore and Wilfrid.
He told a press conference at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery: "These are the best craftsmen the Anglo-Saxons have got, working with the best materials, and producing incredible results.
Michelet is concerned with how the Anglo-Saxons see themselves in relation to the land they inhabit and to the wider world, in which, according to inherited learned tradition, Britain was a remote and peripheral place.
According to new research conducted by an international expert at the University of Chester, the popular perception that the early Anglo-Saxons would mark death with grandiose gestures is untrue.
Instead, he sees this complex poem as reinscribing "a link between warfare and sanctity onto the myth-pattern of Christian sainthood" (120), perhaps in response to the difficulty Anglo-Saxons had in imagining nonviolence as a positive value.