Anglo-Saxon

(redirected from Anglo-Saxons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Anglo-Saxon

a native or inhabitant of England prior to the Norman Conquest

a person of Anglo-Saxon (especially British) descent whose native tongue is English and whose culture is strongly influenced by English culture as in WASP for 'White Anglo-Saxon Protestant'

English prior to about 1100

References in classic literature ?
The dialogue which they maintained between them, was carried on in Anglo-Saxon, which, as we said before, was universally spoken by the inferior classes, excepting the Norman soldiers, and the immediate personal dependants of the great feudal nobles.
Haigha replied eagerly, coming in front of Alice to introduce her, and spreading out both his hands towards her in an Anglo-Saxon attitude.
Upon these rules of accent and alliteration the strict form of Anglo-Saxon verse was based.
For some 600 years between 597 when Roman letters arrived in England with missionaries, and the 10th century when runic epigraphy died out, says Symons, the Anglo-Saxons had two visually and functionally discrete means of producing written texts.
Anglo-Saxons loved riddles, both verbal and visual, which run through their poetry and art.
Invading Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Normans may have shaped the history, culture and language of the British Isles, but they left surprisingly few genetic traces behind.
THE Anglo-Saxons were Germanic warrior-farmers who invaded at the end of the Roman era.
Nor did the Anglo-Saxons encounter large tracts of dense regenerative forest when they arrived.
On Saturday,11am to 3pm, explore the daily lives of the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings by handling some of the things they would have seen every day and on Sunday, step into the shoes of Eadfrith, the monk who hand-wrote the Lindisfarne Gospels by trying out using an Anglo-Saxon quill.
On Saturday, 11am to 3pm, explore the daily lives of the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings by handling some of the things they would have seen every day and on Sunday, step into the shoes of Eadfrith, the monk who hand-wrote the Lindisfarne Gospels by trying out using an Anglo-Saxon quill.
PEOPLE can learn about how the Anglo-Saxons and Victorians lived during two evening workshops in Warwick.
These 700 years saw continuous ebb and flow due to the invasions by Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings and Normans, each adding to or taking away from the written word and each adding a new language and in some cases a new religion.
Even Churchill himself did not speak of Anglo-Saxons much.
And where the Welsh opt for the more simpler "leave", as the early Anglo-Saxons would have, the English, preferring the language of the Roman invaders, are more likely to say "departure".
Radio carbon dating demonstrates a likely date of around 780AD, meaning these remains are Christian Anglo-Saxons.