Assyria

(redirected from Ancient Assyria)
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Related to Ancient Assyria: Assyria, Mesopotamia
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Words related to Assyria

an ancient kingdom in northern Mesopotamia which is in present-day Iraq

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Horses were a vital component in warfare and hunting, reflected especially in the art of ancient Assyria (9th-7th centuries BC), whose ornate horse trappings illusrate the prestige and status of the horse, rider and charioteer.
Among his topics are the homeland and origin of the independent Assyrian tribes of Tiyari and Hakkari, the Roman Catholic missionaries and their impact on the Assyrians, the Kurdish settlement in ancient Assyria, the Ottoman reforms, the beginnings of centralization, the subjection of the tribes in 1843, Teckoma as the last Assyrian independent province, and the end of the Kurdish wars in 1847.
Paintings inspired by sculptures of Ancient Assyria, Bablyon and Daric-Persia
The meaning of the tablet had puzzled scholars since it was discovered more than 150 years ago in the ruins of the Royal Palace at Nineveh in ancient Assyria, which is now Armenia.
Jonah, that reluctant missionary to ancient Assyria (modern Iraq), learned the hard way that everyone belongs, no one is "out." I belong; therefore, I am.
Quintessentially Romantic in its exoticism and harrowing violence, it shows the king of ancient Assyria witnessing his dying wish--the slaughter of his slaves, harem, and horses.
In ancient Assyria it was known as "The Shedder of Blood" and as it passes so close to Earth we should reflect on the continuing chaos in Iraq and the ominous fact that more British and US troops have been killed since the war ended than during it.
Simo Parpola of Helsinki University has recently created quite a stir in Assyriological circles by claiming not only that the religion of ancient Assyria was basically monotheistic, but also that this system of belief exercised a formative influence upon the development of such core concepts of Christianity as the nature of the trinity and the soteriological role of Christ.
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