uninflected

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Synonyms for uninflected

(of the voice) not inflected

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not inflected

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expressing a grammatical category by using two or more words rather than inflection

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References in periodicals archive ?
The study shows that English has shifted from being a fully synthetic toward an analytic language through assimilation and analogy.
While English has made strides toward an analytic language in its present form, it cannot be literally assumed that it has lost all its irregular inflections (Baugh and Cable, 2002).
A minor theme in this work is that Tamil has historically developed from a synthetic to an analytic language over the course of time.
More fundamentally, when she describes the "leakages" between metaphoric and analytic language, and between specialized vocabularies (legal, astronomical, medical, botanical, and so many others), which become fused by Shakespeare in a kind of poetic "ur-language," she uses her talent for rational distinctions to help us appreciate his achievement in the sonnets.
Strangely, in the light of the book's espousal of pertinence in analytic language, Interpreting Popular Music appears to me to align itself with postmodern hermeneutics, applied to musics which are not (necessarily) postmodern artefacts (at least, that status is not argued).
Garden path sentences are a common problem in written English because English is an analytic language and therefore relies heavily on word order to establish what role each word plays within the sentence.
Indeed, Theweleit applies the analytic language of the most adult, "male" world (by his definition) to the description of object-choice: a man's partner is a question of "strategy," of instruments, uses, and ends, of payoff, payout, and payback - all unconscious to be sure, but impossible without reference to rationalities of the social system really learned (at least in modern Western society) only in adolescence.
Analytic languages have stricter and more elaborated syntactic rules-word order carries a lot of importance, showing subject-object relationships.
As is known, analytic languages tend to rely heavily on context and pragmatic considerations for the interpretation of sentences, since they don't specify as much as synthetic languages in terms of agreement and cross-reference between different parts of the sentence.