Amy Lowell


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Synonyms for Amy Lowell

United States poet (1874-1925)

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A combination of worldly literary merchandiser, gifted poetic innovator, futurist, and transcendent nature mystic, Amy Lowell brought a unique viewpoint and gifts to American poetry, but neither her personality nor her work was understood in her lifetime, and today there is need for new studies and reinterpretation.
Symbolism first made itself felt as an influence in England toward the end of the 19th century in the development of free verse and may have had some indirect effect on Pound and Amy Lowell's Imagism.
During 1998, she spent a year in Florence, Italy, as an Amy Lowell Travelling Scholar and completed a poetry manuscript, The Moment.
She is on an Amy Lowell traveling fellowship and lives in Florence, Italy.
Well, I picked up a telephone to call Amy Lowell at the
Her honors include a Rona Jaffe Writer's Award, an Artist Fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a Hodder Fellowship in Creative Writing at Princeton University, and an Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship.
Thus, for example, Amy Lowell adopted the pose of a cigar-smoking gender-bender who gave public readings of her not-so-thinly-veiled lesbian poetry.
In 1914 Pound turned to Vorticism, and Amy Lowell largely took over the spiritual leadership of the group.
They worried that they were not always enhanced by her agency." Regardless of the infighting, Amy Lowell and Ada Russell did have a large circle of friends made up of other writers, society people, and family members who frequented their home, often for elaborate dinner parties.
Eliot, Mina Loy, Max Bodenheim, Amy Lowell, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Ezra Pound, Hilda Doolittle (H.D.), Carl Sandburg, Richard Aldington, Conrad Aiken, and Sherwood Anderson.
He wrote critical biographies of Amy Lowell (1958), James McNeil Whistler (1959), and Dorothy Richardson (1967), and a study of D.
"An Opera House" is a rhapsodic setting of a text by Amy Lowell that dramatically describes the opulent interior of an opera house and the first sound that emerges from the prima donna and floats through the air like some sort of beautiful, magical bubble.
In this poem, Amy Lowell shows how poetry, above all, catches the intensity of the moment.
He has also received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, in addition to two Pushcart Prizes, the Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Scholarship, and Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets.
Pulitzer prizes were awarded for the following: fiction, Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis; biography, The Life of Sir William Osler by Harvey Cushing; history, The History of the United States by Edward Channing; poetry, What's O'Clock by Amy Lowell; drama, Craig's Wife by George Kelly.