amicus curiae

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Synonyms for amicus curiae

an adviser to the court on some matter of law who is not a party to the case

References in periodicals archive ?
Bevins amicus brief supports Hands-On Originals, a small t-shirt printing business in Lexington.
For information on the IADC's amicus brief program and to view past briefs, please visit the Amicus Briefs page on the IADC website.
The amicus brief, which is filed by parties who have an interest in the case but are not involved, outlines the tech companies' interest on keeping U.
Insurer Market Synergy urged a Kansas judge Friday to throw out the "barrage" of amicus briefs filed by supporters of DOL's rule on the basis that the briefs are "irrelevant" to Market Synergy's request to preliminarily halt the rule's implementation.
CalCPA's amicus brief argues that the Court of Appeal should affirm the trial court's opinion, and that proof of reasonable reliance is necessary for at least three reasons:
The March 9-filed amicus brief, authored by Professor Laurence Tribe of Harvard University, supports review of the case by the nation's highest court.
On the merits: The need to avoid overlap and repetition is as important among amicus merits briefs as it is between amicus briefs and the party brief it is supporting.
In 1996, the Israeli Supreme Court, apparently with the particular influence of Chief Justice Aharon Barak, accepted an amicus brief for the first time.
This article discusses how often Florida appellate courts cite to or rely on amicus briefs in their opinions and also highlights effective amicus brief writing strategies.
NDAA has joined in an amicus brief prepared by the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation, asserting that neither defendant should have his conviction reversed.
The International Franchising Association has filed an amicus brief urging the U.
The role of the amicus brief in litigation before the United States Supreme Court has changed significantly over time.
The full process for filing an amicus brief can take a significant amount of time.
9) Whereas between 1946-1955 the percentage of cases decided with at least one amicus brief was only 23% in the U.