Amerindian language


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Synonyms for Amerindian language

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One hundred and eighty Amerindian languages are spoken in remote areas and a number of other languages are spoken by immigrants and their descendants.
In the Spanish viceroyalty of Peru, however, they were forced to do parish work (doctrina) and missionary outreach, which required the study of Amerindian languages and ways of life.
The goal of this volume is to shed light on clause linkage patterns in a range of Amerindian languages, as well as on the typological co-variates of clause combining.
10) In regard to other languages, the authors indicate that Mexico has the largest population of indigenous languages (henceforth ILs) and the highest linguistic diversity in the Americas: with 63 recognized Amerindian languages classified in eight families and fifteen subfamilies.
Amerindian languages, on the other hand, are generally verb-oriented, stressing process, actions and constant flux.
Entendre in this passage means "to understand": Lahontan claims he does not believe the missionary's texts because he understands Amerindian languages.
Or compare the disparity between Indo-European and Amerindian languages.
The impact on Sapir and Bloomfield, who applied the techniques to Amerindian languages, came to be very influential for the ethnographic American tradition (Hewson, pp.
Huge populations spoke hundreds of Amerindian languages, some of which survived after the arrival of Europeans.
Was it as complex as Amerindian languages or Inuit?
Two of the earlier stories, "The Cannon of Punta Grande" by Nestor Taboada Teran and "The Indian Paulino" by Ricardo Ocampo, may disturb current-day readers with their negative characterization of cholos, whose mixed cultural background and mastery of both Spanish and Amerindian languages allow them to function as middlemen.
Matthews's examples came overwhelmingly from Greek and Latin as well as English, but Katamba ranges widely through exotic languages; Innuit and Amerindian languages as well as those of Africa and East Asia.