American Indian

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Synonyms for American Indian

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The mascot had drawn the ire of some American Indians after photos and video of a student dressed in the buckskin costume and feathered headdress appeared on social media.
SUICIDE CONTINUES to disproportionately impact American Indians and Alaska Natives, with rates more than three times higher than population groups with the lowest suicide rates.
In fact, the Pew Research study also revealed that, while 50 percent of those surveyed identified as having mixed heritage, only 22 percent say they have a lot in common with American Indians and only 19 percent say they have had a lot of contact with their relatives who are American Indian.
In the first chapter, "Settling into the City: American Indian Migration and Urbanization, 1900-1945," Rosenthal tells the story of the migration of American Indians in the Southwest and California Indians to urban areas and places where labor was needed before World War II.
Tribal colleges and universities and community programs are collectively encouraging sustainable adoption of broadband use and services so that underserved American Indians can learn how to become digital citizens.
The franchise feared that the Braves would view the planned celebration as a protest against their team name, and decided to scale back the planned festivities; the singing, dancing, and appearances by American Indians were all cancelled.
ERIC Descriptors: Academic Achievement; Achievement Gap; American Indians; American Indian Students; Data Collection; Data Analysis; State Legislation; Financial Support; State Aid; Criterion Referenced Tests; Reading Achievement; Mathematics Achievement; Science Achievement; Scores; White Students; Racial Differences; Reservation American Indians; Nonreservation American Indians; Graduation Rate; Dropout Rate; Advanced Placement; Suspension; Expulsion; Substance Abuse
During November, the federal government recognizes the contributions of American Indians as part of American Indian Heritage Month.
Of the country's 4.3 million American Indians, one-third are under 18.
Census, American Indians and Alaska Natives make up 1% (2.4 million) of the US population (Ogunwole, 2006).
The "Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History," by Patrick LeBeau, is a concise listing of 100 of " the most significant topics in American Indian history from first contact to recent years." The ultimate goal is "to have those topics serve as signposts to point and lead students to a greater and richer knowledge of the story of American Indians rather than to tell the complete story." Because there are over 550 federally recognized American Indian tribes living in the United States as of 2008, the limiting of topics to 100 was daunting but crucial.
Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics and sponsored by the Office of Indian Education, is a two-part study designed to assess education conditions for American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Many years ago, I used this debate as a kind of foundation to argue that writing histories of American Indians, particularly American Indian education history, might best be done by American Indians themselves.
Moore-Hale, who is of Waccamaw-Souian descent, has dedicated her life to American Indians in her community and in the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections.
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