Aleksandr Borodin

(redirected from Alexander Borodin)
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Related to Alexander Borodin: Mikhail Glinka, Mily Balakirev
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Synonyms for Aleksandr Borodin

Russian composer (1833-1887)

References in periodicals archive ?
The proposed team was drawn from the so-called "Mighty Handful" group of nationalist composers - Modest Mussorgsky, CAsar Cui, Alexander Borodin and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.
1 by Tchaikovsky; "Stranger in Paradise" is from "Kismet," a Broadway show and movie with a score adapted from the music of Alexander Borodin.
They later transformed the exotic themes of Russian composer Alexander Borodin into songs such as "Stranger in Paradise" and "Baubles, Bangles and Beads" for "Kismet" (1953), which won a Tony Award for best musical.
2 en Re mayor del ruso Alexander Borodin constituyen dos obras maestras del genero, indiscutibles para representar clara y paralelamente la personalidad musical de ambos compositores.
Prince Igor (1890), the first item in repertory, the only opera by Alexander Borodin, full-time chemist and part-time composer, was left unfinished by him.
The year's popular songs included "Stranger in Paradise," based on a melody by Alexander Borodin, "Hernando's Hideaway" and "Hey, There," both from the Broadway musical Pajama Game, "I Love Paris," "Careless Love," and "Young at Heart.
Alexander Borodin, primarily a scientist rather than a composer, died before completing his opera, Prince Igor.
The music included pieces by Alexander Borodin, Georgi Sviridov, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky, including from "Swan Lake'' and "The Nutcracker.
Like all the music in that show, the melody was taken from music composed by Alexander Borodin, in this case, the Gliding Dance of the Maidens, from the Polovtsian Dances.
The piece was dedicated to Mussorgsky and Alexander Borodin, two of the legendary Mighty Handful, a circle of five Russian composers.
Composers/lyricists Robert Wright and George Forrest used exotic themes from Russian composer Alexander Borodin to evoke the atmosphere of ancient Baghdad, and the lyrics are very clever.