Albert Sabin


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Synonyms for Albert Sabin

United States microbiologist (born in Poland) who developed the Sabin vaccine that is taken orally against poliomyelitis (born 1906)

References in periodicals archive ?
That same year, Albert Sabin's live, attenuated vaccine, too, was licensed.
One of my most persistent memories of my friend Albert Sabin, who developed an oral vaccine against poliomyelitis (polio), was how, when we met after one of my health-related missions overseas, he would question me about the polio situation in the country I visited.
Did you know that Albert Sabin developed the oral vaccine for polio?
Use of this inactivated poliovirus vaccine and subsequent widespread use of the oral poliovirus vaccine developed by Albert Sabin led to establishment of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988.
Schneider, PhD, the Albert Sabin Professor of Molecular Pathogenesis, associate director for translational research and co-director of the Breast Cancer Program at NYU Langone Medical Center.
While we held up Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin as heroes for providing vaccine protection from "infantile paralysis," their rescue extended only to those who had not been struck down.
1956: Albert Sabin discovered the oral polio vaccine.
Today the live attenuated vaccine produced by Albert Sabin is the one in common use, with the advantage that it can be given by mouth.
Stringer, Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, ML 524 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA; email: stringjr@ucmail.uc.edu
There is no "cure," but with the 1955 vaccine created by Jonas Salk and the 1962 vaccine from Albert Sabin, polio occurring through natural infection was eliminated from the United States by 1979, and from the Western Hemisphere by 1991.
He describes the wartime governmental campaigns to protect children against the ravages of typhoid fever, diphtheria, and yellow fever and explains the legendary rivalry between Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin and their respective polio vaccines.
Should they be working on live viruses, as proposed by Albert Sabin, or killed ones?