symptom

(redirected from Alarm Symptom)
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  • noun

Synonyms for symptom

Synonyms for symptom

something visible or evident that gives grounds for believing in the existence or presence of something else

Words related to symptom

(medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease

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anything that accompanies X and is regarded as an indication of X's existence

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References in periodicals archive ?
The average waiting times for endoscopy and colonoscopy were 27 and 29 days, respectively, including patients with alarm symptoms for malignancy.
Alarm symptoms include unintentional weight loss, vomiting, bleeding and dysphagia.
These Italian researchers enrolled adults with at least 3 months of typical GERD symptoms and no alarm symptoms or major comorbidities, who had been referred to a gastroenterologist.
Testing is not required in most patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease, but patients with alarm symptoms or persistent symptoms despite medical therapy should undergo upper endoscopy and/or ambulatory pH studies.
Management changes were made in 41% of the 39 children who had alarm symptoms and in 59% of the 53 who did not.
The trend in primary care is toward empiric treatment to control symptoms, and away from a strict diagnosis in patients who have no alarm symptoms such as hematemesis.
Colonoscopy should only be undertaken if alarm symptoms are present or if iron deficiency persists despite oral iron therapy and correction of reversible causes (e.
Patients with alarm symptoms or a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease also were excluded.
Upper endoscopy is recommended for elderly patients with alarm symptoms, new-onset GERD, or longstanding disease (SOR: C, expert consensus; see TABLE).
Patients with the onset of dyspepsia at age 56 or older or those with alarm symptoms (bleeding, anemia, early satiety, unexplained weight loss, dysphagia or odynophagia, persistent vomiting, family history of gastrointestinal malignancy, previous documented peptic ulcer, abdominal mass, or lymphadenopathy) at any age should undergo immediate upper endoscopy.
Initial endoscopy should be considered for 2 categories of patients: those with alarm symptoms (eg, dysphagia, odynophagia, bleeding, weight loss, or anemia) and those at higher risk for Barrett's esophagus.
Patients with alarm symptoms for cancer or bleeding should undergo a thorough diagnostic work-up.
Guidelines from the American Gastro-enterological Association for the initial approach to young patients with dyspepsia without alarm symptoms is to first "test and treat" for those testing positive for H pylori, prescribe empiric antisecretory therapy for those testing negative, and proceed with endoscopy for recurrent or persistent dyspepsia at 4 to 8 weeks.